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Biology

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BIOL107 Introduction to Cell Biology Course Page

Description: An introduction to cell structure and function. Major topics include the molecules and structures that comprise prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, the mechanisms by which energy is harvested and used by cells, how cells reproduce, and how information is stored and used within a cell via the processes of DNA replication, transcription, and translation. Prerequisites: Biology 30 and Chemistry 30. Note: BIOL 107 is not a prerequisite for BIOL 108. BIOL 107 and 108 can be taken in either term.

BIOL108 Introduction to Biological Diversity Course Page

Description: Examines the major lineages of life on Earth. Overview of evolutionary principles and classification, the history of life, and the key adaptations of prokaryotes, protists, fungi, plants, and animals. Laboratories survey the diversity of biological form and function, and introduce students to data collection and scientific writing. Prerequisite: Biology 30. Note: BIOL 107 is not a prerequisite for BIOL 108. BIOL 107 and 108 can be taken in either term.

BIOL201 Eukaryotic Cellular Biology Course Page

Description: A structural and functional dissection of a eukaryotic cell. Detection of specific molecules at the ultrastructural level; plasma membrane structure and function; cytoskeleton involvement in intracellular transport, mitosis, and cytokinesis; the endomembrane system, protein targeting, exocytosis and endocytosis; nuclear structure and function; cell cycle control and cancer. Prerequisite: BIOL 107 and a 100-level Chemistry course, or SCI 100. Note: Not to be taken by students with credit in CELL 201, in addition, not available to students currently enrolled in CELL 201.

BIOL207 Molecular Genetics and Heredity Course Page

Description: The chromosomal and molecular basis for the transmission and function of genes. The construction of genetic and physical maps of genes and genomes. Strategies for the isolation of specific genes. Examples of regulatory mechanisms for the expression of the genetic material in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Prerequisite: BIOL 107 or SCI 100.

BIOL208 Principles of Ecology Course Page

Description: Ecology is the scientific study of interactions between organisms and their environment in a hierarchy of levels of organization: individuals, populations, communities, and ecosystems. Provides a comprehensive survey of general concepts that can stand alone or serve as preparation for advanced courses in ecology. Labs emphasize collection, analysis, and interpretation of data from ecological experiments and field studies to illustrate and complement lecture material. Examples are drawn from a broad range of organisms and systems. Prerequisite: BIOL 108 or SCI 100. Open to students in the BSc Forestry and BSc Forest Business Management program once they have completed REN R 120 and REN R 205.

BIOL221 Mechanisms of Evolution Course Page

Description: Discusses the major features of the evolutionary process, including the fossil record, basic population genetics, variation, natural selection, adaptation, and speciation. Prerequisites: BIOL 107, 108 or SCI 100. Credit cannot be obtained for both BIOL 221 and 321.

BIOL298 Understanding Biological Research Course Page

Description: An introduction to the process of scientific research including the different approaches to research within biology, formulating research questions, hands-on skill development, experimental design, data collection and analysis, critical thinking, communication of findings, ethics, and career opportunities. Students will attend lectures and selected seminars, and participate in biological research under the supervision of an academic staff member in the Department of Biological Sciences. Open to undergraduate students in the Faculty of Science with preference given to students in Honors and Specialization Programs in the Department of Biological Sciences, and BSc General students (Biological Sciences major). Consent of Department of Biological Sciences required. All students must apply for admission. Prerequisite: BIOL 107 or 108 or SCI 100. See the Biological Sciences website for more details at www.biology.ualberta.ca/courses.

BIOL299 Research Opportunity Program Course Page

Description: A credit/no-credit course under the supervision of an academic member of the Department of Biological Sciences. Normally taken in the second year. Recommended that students have a minimum of *30 but not more than *60 in a program in the Faculty of Science. Prerequisite: GPA of 2.5 or higher, credit in BIOL 107 or 108 or SCI 100 and/or consent of Department. Normally taken in addition to a full course load. Project and course information available at ROP website or Department of Biological Sciences. Note: Application does not guarantee an ROP position. Credit may be obtained twice.

BIOL315 Biology: An Historical Perspective Course Page

Description: An outline of the scientific foundations of biological discovery. Students must have a sophisticated understanding of modern concepts in biology, be prepared to write a major essay on a focused topic, deliver an oral presentation and participate actively in class discussion. Prerequisite: a third-year course in the biological sciences or consent of instructor.

BIOL321 Mechanisms of Evolution Course Page

Description: Discusses the major features of the evolutionary process, including the fossil record, basic population genetics, variation, natural selection, adaptation, and speciation. Prerequisites: BIOL 108 and any 200-level Biological Sciences course. SCI 100 may be used in lieu of BIOL 108.

BIOL322 Diversity and Evolution of Microbial Life Course Page

Description: The diversity of microscopic life forms, both prokaryotic (bacteria and archaea) and eukaryotic (protists, fungi, phytoplankton), will be explored. The evolutionary forces responsible for this diversity will be described in detail and contrasted to those at work in macroscopic eukaryotes. Students will learn about the molecular methods used to identify and classify both culturable and non-culturable microbes, and genetically characterize entire populations. Prerequisites: BIOL 107 and 108 or SCI 100, and a 200-level Biological Sciences course. MICRB 265 recommended.

BIOL330 Introduction to Biological Data Course Page

Description: Expands on prior introductions to the scientific method and examines the steps involved in the planning, collection, organization, analysis and presentation of biological data. Classes will explore the types of data used to answer a variety of biological questions and will review several different sampling designs, assess the benefits and limitations of various data types for scientific inference, and integrate the statistical methods that are common to other introductory courses. Labs will teach students how spreadsheets and relational databases can be used to manipulate, analyze, and present the results of scientific research. Prerequisites: BIOL 208 and STAT 151 or SCI 151.

BIOL331 Population Ecology Course Page

Description: Principles of population ecology as they apply to plants and animals; population consequences of variation among individuals; habitat structure and population structure; habitat selection and foraging theory; life tables, demography, and the evolution of life history patterns; population dynamics; interactions among organisms (predation, competition, mutualism); and population regulation. Prerequisites: BIOL 208; any one of MATH 113, 115, 120, 125 or SCI 100; STAT 151 or SCI 151.

BIOL332 Community Ecology Course Page

Description: Principles of community ecology, applied to plants and animals. The nature of communities, functional groups and rarity; niche theory and competition; disturbance and other alternatives to competition; food webs (predation, herbivory and disease); diversity (determinants, functional consequences and gradients); island communities. Prerequisites: BIOL 208; STAT 151 or SCI 151; and any one of MATH 113, 115, 120, 125 or SCI 100. May not be taken for credit if credit already obtained in ZOOL 332.

BIOL333 Wetland Science and Management Course Page

Description: The course includes an introduction to the hydrology, biogeochemistry and ecology of wetland ecosystems. Topics covered include classification, geomorphic setting, distribution, functions and ecosystem services of wetlands. Human use, alteration and management of wetlands are examined. An emphasis is placed on wetlands and wetland management in Western Canada, including boreal peatlands and prairie marshes. A full day field trip on a Saturday is required. Prerequisite: one of BIOL 208, REN R 250, or EAS 201. Credit may be obtained in only one of BOT 333 and BIOL 333.

BIOL335 Principles of Systematics Course Page

Description: An introduction to the principles, methods, and applications of biological systematics, including reconstruction of phylogenies, creation of classifications, historical biogeography, and applications in evolutionary biology. Each student will analyze phylogenetic data and write a description of a species and its relationships. Prerequisite: BIOL 108 or SCI 100 and a 200-level Biological Sciences course; BIOL 321 strongly recommended.

BIOL340 Global Biogeochemistry Course Page

Description: An introduction to biogeochemical cycles in the environment. Discusses processes and reactions governing cycles in the atmosphere, lithosphere, terrestrial ecosystems, freshwater wetlands and lakes, river estuaries, and the oceans. Outlines the global cycles of water, carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur. Group discussions will incorporate current topics in anthropogenic alterations of natural cycles that lead to ecosystem degradation. Prerequisites: CHEM 101 or SCI 100 and BIOL 208; MICRB 265 strongly recommended.

BIOL341 Ecotoxicology Course Page

Description: An overview of the adverse effects of chemicals or physical agents on biological systems in an ecological context. This course takes a multidisciplinary approach to understanding biological effects and their assessment. Prerequisites: BIOL 208, ZOOL 241, and CHEM 164 or 261, or instructor consent.

BIOL361 Marine Science Course Page

Description: An introduction to marine science and marine biology including history of marine exploration, essential features of the physical marine environment, a survey of major marine communities and adaptations of the organisms that live in each, overviews of selected groups of marine organisms (e.g., marine mammals), and human impact on the oceans. Recommended as preparation for courses offered through the Bamfield Marine Station (see courses listed under MA SC). Prerequisite: ZOOL 250 or BIOL 208.

BIOL364 Freshwater Ecology Course Page

Description: An introduction to the ecology of freshwater ecosystems. Lectures will examine the roles of biota in ecological patterns and processes in lakes, ponds, rivers, and streams, emphasizing north-temperate and boreal regions. Seminars will focus on recent papers from the primary literature. Designed to stand-alone or to provide a biological complement to BIOL 464. Prerequisite: BIOL 208.

BIOL365 Methods in Freshwater Ecology Course Page

Description: A practical course introducing students to techniques used in the field and lab to biomonitor lakes and streams. Topics covered will include plankton production and composition, fish and benthos community structure, herbivory and predation, and paleolimnology. The laboratory component includes field trips and independent research projects. Pre or corequisite: BIOL 364 or permission of instructor.

BIOL366 Northern Ecology Course Page

Description: Examines the ecology of boreal and arctic ecosystems, including postglacial history, climate, geology, nutrient cycling and energy flow in forests, wetlands, lakes and marine systems, animal and plant adaptations to cold and current human impacts. Prerequisite: BIOL 208. Credit cannot be obtained for BIOL 366 and any of the following courses: REN R 365, 463, 466.

BIOL367 Conservation Biology Course Page

Description: This course introduces the principles of conservation biology with an emphasis on ecological processes operating at population, community and ecosystem levels of organization. Threats to biological diversity, ranging from species introductions to habitat destruction will be discussed along with conservation solutions ranging from the design of protected areas through conservation legislation. Prerequisite: BIOL 208. Credit cannot be obtained in both BIOL 367 and REN R 364.

BIOL380 Genetic Analysis of Populations Course Page

Description: Application of molecular biology to the study of systematics, structure of natural populations, mating systems, and forensics. Among the topics discussed are molecular techniques used to detect genetic variation in natural populations, methods to construct phylogenies using molecular data, mathematical models of population structure, paternity analysis, and DNA fingerprinting. Prerequisite: BIOL 207. BIOL 321 recommended.

BIOL381 A Planet in Crisis Course Page

Description: This course examines how humankind's collective activities, including altering the climate, have significantly affected the natural planetary balance. We will discuss human population growth and unsustainable resource use; the movement of pollutants through the atmosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere; the impacts these stressors have on ecosystem services and human health; and how certain impacts have been and can be mitigated by environmental policies and laws. Groups of students will produce a short video documentary on a topic related to how humans impact their environment. Prerequisite: BIOL 208.

BIOL384 Global Change and Ecosystems Course Page

Description: Ecological impacts of climate change and large-scale human activities on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The focus of this course is to learn to write brief technical summaries of current environment issues, in a fashion that can be understood by an educated citizen. Topics such as climate change, water management projects, invasion of exotic species and national parks management are presented as the forum to evaluate options, trade-offs and solutions to environmental social issues. Prerequisites: BIOL 208 or consent of Instructor. BOT 205 recommended.

BIOL391 Techniques in Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics Course Page

Description: A laboratory course introducing students to techniques in gene manipulation, protein expression and bioinformatics by following a gene through a thematic series of molecular manipulations. Restricted to Honors and Specialization students in Biological Sciences and consent of instructor. Prerequisites: BIOL 207 and BIOCH 200. Not to be taken by students currently enrolled in GENET 420 or with credit in GENET 420. Credit can be obtained for only one of BIOL 391, IMIN 391 or MMI 391.

BIOL392 Laboratory Techniques in Molecular Ecology and Systematics Course Page

Description: A laboratory course introducing students to current molecular biology techniques and associated analyses used to study population genetics, systematics, and evolutionary biology in natural populations. Students will develop microsatellite marker systems and use them to examine the genetic structure of a natural population. A comparative bioinformatic approach will be used to generate sequence data to investigate the use of single nucleotide polymorphisms in candidate gene analysis and in phylogenetic inference. Prerequisite: BIOL 207, 208 and consent of instructor, corequisite: BIOL 380. Note: BIOL 392 and 592 cannot both be taken for credit.

BIOL398 Research Project Course Page

Description: Directed research done under the supervision of an academic member of the Department of Biological Sciences. Normally for students in their third year of study. Successful completion of this course requires a written report on the research project. Prerequisites: A 200-level Biological Sciences course and consent of the Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies. Credit for this course may be obtained only once.

BIOL399A Research Project Course Page

Description: Directed research done under the supervision of an academic member of the Department of Biological Sciences. Normally for students in their third year of study. Successful completion of this course requires a written report on the research project. Prerequisites: A 200-level Biological Sciences course and consent of the Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies. Credit for this course may be obtained only once.

BIOL399B Research Project Course Page

Description: Directed research done under the supervision of an academic member of the Department of Biological Sciences. Normally for students in their third year of study. Successful completion of this course requires a written report on the research project. Prerequisites: A 200-level Biological Sciences course and consent of the Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies. Credit for this course may be obtained only once.

BIOL400 Science Internship Practicum Course Page

Description: Required by all students who have just completed the on-site portion of the Science Internship Program. Must be completed during the first academic term following return to full-time studies. Note: A grade of F to A+ will be determined by the student's job performance as evaluated by the employer, by the student's performance in the completion of an internship practicum report, and by the student's ability to learn from the experiences of the Internship as demonstrated in an oral presentation. Prerequisites: WKEXP 955 and 956.

BIOL409 Zoonoses Course Page

Description: This course will examine the biology of zoonotic agents and the implication of host-pathogen interactions to disease susceptibility and resistance. Students will apply these basic concepts towards the understanding of issues governing pathogenesis, pathology, epidemiology, control and surveillance of zoonotic diseases. Focus will be placed on zoonotic agents currently having a significant impact on animal and public health. Lectures will be followed by active discussion of selected readings. Prerequisites: one of IMIN 200, ZOOL 352, ZOOL 354, ENT 392 or consent of instructor. Credit cannot be obtained for both BIOL 409 and BIOL 509.

BIOL421 Molecular Evolution and Systematics Course Page

Description: Methods for inferring evolutionary trees and their applications to the fields of comparative biology, molecular evolution, and systematics. Topics to be covered include phylogenetic inference, molecular evolution integrated at the organismal and population level, and evolutionary developmental genetics. Labs emphasize practical experience in data analysis. Prerequisite: BIOL 335 or consent of instructor. BIOL 380 or 392 recommended. Credit cannot be obtained for both BIOL 421 and BIOL 521. Offered in alternate years.

BIOL430 Experimental Biology Course Page

Description: Emphasis is on the design of experiments and analysis of data collected from field and laboratory studies in Biology. Prerequisites: STAT 141 or 151 or SCI 151 and a 300-level Biological Sciences course. Credit cannot be obtained for both BIOL 430 and REN R 480.

BIOL432 Field Methods in Ecology Course Page

Description: Design, execution, analysis, and presentation of problems in behavioral, population, and community ecology in a field environment. Field exercises, demonstration of techniques, and data collection for independent projects will take place during the two weeks preceding the Fall term at a field station off the main campus. Final reports are due in the last week of September. Prerequisites: BIOL 331 or 332 or ZOOL 371 or BOT 332; a statistics course such as STAT 151 or SCI 151, BIOL 330 or 430. This course requires payment of additional miscellaneous fees. Refer to the Fees Payment Guide in the University Regulations and Information for Students section of the Calendar.

BIOL433 Plant-Animal Interactions Course Page

Description: Plants and animals have a long co-evolutionary history, and this course explores many of the ways in which plants and animals use and abuse each other. Specific topics include pollination biology, herbivory, and dispersal. Emphasis is on both the evolutionary ecology and ecological implications of these interactions. Prerequisite: BIOL 331 or 332 or BOT 332 or ZOOL 371.

BIOL434 Chemical Ecology Course Page

Description: An introduction to the broad field of Chemical Ecology through survey, discussion and analysis of current and historical literature. Topics include a wide array of chemically-mediated ecological interactions in a variety of taxa. Studies that analyze the importance of the use of chemical signals for habitat selection, resource acquisition, reproduction, defense and social interactions are discussed. Students research topics in Chemical Ecology and present their findings in oral and written formats. Prerequisite: BIOL 208. CHEM 164 or 261 recommended. Credit cannot be obtained for both BIOL 434 and 534. Offered in alternate years.

BIOL440 Watershed Ecohydrology Course Page

Description: The course will introduce students to theory and techniques employed in the analysis of physical, hydrological, chemical, and ecological properties of ecosystems using a watershed (catchment) approach. Focus will be on landscape interactions or linkages between upland, wetland/riparian, and surface-water in the study of the natural ecohydrologic function and response to disturbance of watershed ecosystems. Emphasis will be placed on Boreal Alberta. Topics are covered through reading the literature and group discussions. Prerequisite: BIOL 333 or 340 or 364 or EAS 223 or REN R 350, or consent of instructor. Credit cannot be obtained for both BIOL 440 and 540.

BIOL445 Current Topics in Animal and Cell Physiology Course Page

Description: Survey, discussion and evaluation of literature dealing with current advances and selected topics in animal and cell physiology. Prerequisite: ZOOL 340 or 342 or 343, or PHYSL 372. Credit may be obtained more than once. Offered in alternate years.

BIOL468 Problems in Conservation Biology Course Page

Description: Seminar and reading course dealing with current problems in conservation biology. Prerequisites: BIOL 367 or REN R 364 and consent of instructor.

BIOL471 Landscape Ecology Course Page

Description: Landscapes are holistic entities whose patterns influence ecological processes. Topics highlighted in this course include landscape components, morphology and dynamics; detecting spatial/temporal change in landscapes; issues of scales; movements of organisms, disturbances, and nutrients across landscape mosaics; and restoration, planning and management in a landscape context. Labs emphasize GIS applications to characterizing landscape patterns and heterogeneity in space and time, distributing and moving organisms across landscapes, and restoring or planning landscapes for conservation objectives. Prerequisites: MATH 115 or SCI 100; STAT 151 or SCI 151; one of BIOL 331, 332 or BOT 332. Previous GIS course is useful. Credit cannot be obtained for both BIOL 471 and 571.

BIOL490 Individual Study Course Page

Description: Registration will be contingent on the student's having made prior arrangements with a faculty member willing to supervise the program. Credit may be obtained more than once. Prerequisites: A 300-level Biological Sciences course and consent of the Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies.

BIOL495 Special Topics in Biology Course Page

Description: Covers specialized topics of current interest to advanced undergraduates in Biological Sciences. Consult the Department for details about current offerings. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Credit for this course may be obtained more than once.

BIOL498 Research Project Course Page

Description: Directed research done under the supervision of an academic member of the Department of Biological Sciences. Normally for students in their fourth year of study. Successful completion of this course requires a written report on the research project. Credit may be obtained more than once. Prerequisites: A 300-level Biological Sciences course and consent of the Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies.

BIOL499A Research Project Course Page

Description: Directed research done under the supervision of an academic member of the Department of Biological Sciences. Normally for students in their fourth year of study. Successful completion of this course requires an oral presentation and a written report on the research project. Prerequisites: A 300-level Biological Sciences course and the consent of the Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies. Note: Students in Honors in Biological Sciences are required to successfully complete BIOL 499.

BIOL499B Research Project Course Page

Description: Directed research done under the supervision of an academic member of the Department of Biological Sciences. Normally for students in their fourth year of study. Successful completion of this course requires an oral presentation and a written report on the research project. Prerequisites: A 300-level Biological Sciences course and the consent of the Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies. Note: Students in Honors in Biological Sciences are required to successfully complete BIOL 499.

BIOL501 Applied Bioinformatics Course Page

Description: Discussion of computational tools and databases used in the analysis of data from high-throughput molecular biology studies. Students will use existing tools, learn the underlying algorithms and their limitations, and will be required to complete an individual research project. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Credit cannot be obtained for both BIOIN 301 and BIOL 501.

BIOL506 Systematics and Evolution Forum Course Page

Description: Lectures and discussions on a variety of subjects in systematics and evolutionary biology by graduate students, staff, and visiting speakers. Credit may be obtained more than once. Prerequisite: consent of instructors for students not registered in the systematics and evolution graduate program.

BIOL509 Advanced Topics in Zoonoses Course Page

Description: This course will examine the biology of zoonotic agents and the implication of host-pathogen interactions to disease susceptibility and resistance. Students will apply these basic concepts towards the understanding of issues governing pathogenesis, pathology, epidemiology, control and surveillance of zoonotic diseases. Focus will be placed on zoonotic agents currently having a significant impact on animal and public health. Lectures will be followed by active discussion of selected readings. Scheduled classes are the same as for BIOL 409, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Credit cannot be obtained for both BIOL 409 and BIOL 509.

BIOL521 Advanced Molecular Evolution and Systematics Course Page

Description: Methods for inferring evolutionary trees and their applications to the fields of comparative biology, molecular evolution, and systematics. Topics to be covered include phylogenetic inference, molecular evolution integrated at the organismal and population level, and evolutionary developmental genetics. Labs emphasize practical experience in data analysis. Lectures and labs are the same as BIOL 421, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Credit cannot be obtained for both BIOL 421 and BIOL 521. Offered in alternate years.

BIOL534 Advanced Chemical Ecology Course Page

Description: An introduction to the broad field of Chemical Ecology through survey, discussion and analysis of current and historical literature. Topics include a wide array of chemically-mediated ecological interactions in a variety of taxa. Studies that analyze the importance of the use of chemical signals for habitat selection, resource acquisition, reproduction, defense and social interactions are discussed. Students research topics in Chemical Ecology and present their findings in oral and written formats. Graduate students complete an additional assignment and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Credit cannot be obtained for both BIOL 434 and 534. Offered in alternate years.

BIOL540 Advanced Watershed Ecohydrology Course Page

Description: The course will introduce students to theory and techniques employed in the analysis of physical, hydrological, chemical, and ecological properties of ecosystems using a watershed (catchment) approach. Focus will be on landscape approaches relating interactions or linkages between upland, wetland/riparian, and surface-water in the study of the natural ecohydrologic function and response to disturbance of watershed ecosystems. Emphasis will be placed on Boreal Alberta. Topics are covered through reading the literature and group discussions. Seminars are the same as for BIOL 440, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Credit cannot be obtained for both BIOL 440 and 540.

BIOL545 Advanced Topics in Animal and Cell Physiology Course Page

Description: Survey, discussion and evaluation of literature dealing with current advances and selected topics in animal and cell physiology. Credit may be obtained more than once. Discussions are the same as for BIOL 445, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Enrolment of students by consent of instructor. Offered in alternate years.

BIOL560 Current Problems in Ecology Course Page

Description: Seminar and reading on current problems concerning selected aspects of ecology. More than one section may be available and topics change from year to year. Please consult the Department for current information. Credit for this course may be obtained more than once. Prerequisite: at least one 400-level ecology course.


Biochemistry

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BIOCH200 Introductory Biochemistry Course Page

Description: An introduction to the fundamental principles of biochemistry. Protein structure and function; enzymes; lipids and the structure of biological membranes; nucleotides and the structure of nucleic acids; bioenergetics and the catabolism of carbohydrates. Prerequisites: CHEM 101 and CHEM 261 or 164, or SCI 100.

BIOCH299 Research Opportunity Program Course Page

Description: A credit/no-credit course under the supervision of an academic member of the Department of Biochemistry. Normally taken after completion of a minimum of *30 but not more than *60 in a program in the Faculty of Science. Prerequisite: GPA of 2.7 or higher, BIOCH 200, and consent of department. Normally taken in addition to a full course load. Note: Application does not guarantee a position. Credit may be obtained twice.

BIOCH310 Bioenergetics and Metabolism Course Page

Description: This course is designed to enable rigorous study of the molecular mechanisms in bioenergetics and metabolism. It covers: the principles of bioenergetics; the reactions and pathways of carbohydrate, lipid, and nitrogen metabolism, and their regulation; oxidative phosphorylation; the integration and hormonal regulation of mammalian metabolism. Prerequisites: BIOCH 200, CHEM 102 (or SCI 100) and CHEM 263 with a minimum GPA of 2.70 for these three courses. In the case of over-subscription, preference will be given to students enrolled in programs with a requirement for this course.

BIOCH320 Structure and Catalysis Course Page

Description: This course is designed to illustrate, in detail, the relationships between structure and function in biological molecules. It covers: the structure of proteins; experimental techniques used to study proteins; selected illustrations of protein function; enzyme catalysis, kinetics, and regulation; structural carbohydrates and glycobiology; the structure of lipids; biological membranes and mechanisms of transport. Prerequisites: BIOCH 200, CHEM 102 (or SCI 100) and CHEM 263 with a minimum GPA of 2.70 for these three courses. In the case of over-subscription, preference will be given to students enrolled in programs with a requirement for this course.

BIOCH330 Nucleic Acids and Molecular Biology Course Page

Description: This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive introduction to the biochemistry of nucleic acids. It covers: the structure and properties of nucleotides and nucleic acids; DNA-based information technologies; genes and chromosome structure; molecular mechanisms in DNA replication, repair, and recombination; RNA metabolism; protein synthesis and targeting; the regulation of gene expression. Prerequisites: BIOCH 200, CHEM 102 (or SCI 100), and CHEM 263, with a minimum GPA of 2.70 for these three courses. In the case of over-subscription, preference will be given to students enrolled in programs with a requirement for this course.

BIOCH398 Research Project Course Page

Description: Supervised research within a laboratory in the Department of Biochemistry. The results of the research project will be presented in a poster. This course is available only as a six week Spring or Summer session course. Prerequisites: Credit in at least one 300-level BIOCH course and consent of the Department. BIOCH 398 may not be taken for credit if credit has been obtained in BIOCH 498 or 499.

BIOCH401A Biochemistry Laboratory Course Page

Description: Laboratory course in modern biochemical techniques. Designed for Biochemistry Honors and Specialization students in their third or fourth year. Other interested students may enrol subject to space limitations. Prerequisites: BIOCH 320 and 330 with a minimum grade of B-, and consent of Department.

BIOCH401B Biochemistry Laboratory Course Page

Description: Laboratory course in modern biochemical techniques. Designed for Biochemistry Honors and Specialization students in their third or fourth year. Other interested students may enrol subject to space limitations. Prerequisites: BIOCH 320 and 330 with a minimum grade of B-, and consent of Department.

BIOCH409 Biochemistry Tutorial Course Page

Description: Research and/or reading course. This course allows a student to study an area of biochemistry in much greater detail than is usual in most courses. The format is usually a reading/tutorial in which the student carries out directed reading and meets with the tutor at regular intervals for discussion and further guidance. Term papers or presentations may be used for evaluation purposes. A mature attitude towards learning is essential, as the course often requires independent study and research. Students who have a particular interest in any specific area of biochemistry are encouraged to meet with the faculty members to explore the possibilities of arranging a mutually satisfactory topic. Prerequisites: At least one of BIOCH 410, 420, 430, 441, 455, or 465. Available only to students in the Biochemistry Specialization or Honors programs. Credit for this course may be obtained more than once.

BIOCH410 Signal Transduction Course Page

Description: Principles of the biochemistry of cell communication and signal transduction through receptor activation, the generation of second messengers, and the control of protein modifications. The course will emphasize the mechanisms responsible for the regulation of cell migration, division and death. Prerequisites: BIOCH 310, 320 and 330, all with a minimum grade of B-, or consent of the Department. This course is intended for students in Honors or Specialization in Biochemistry. Students in other programs may be admitted subject to availability and with the consent of the Department. Graduate students may not register for credit (see BIOCH 510).

BIOCH420 Proteins: Structure, Function, and Regulation Course Page

Description: Principles of protein structure, function, and dynamics, with an introduction to force fields used in modern molecular dynamics. Focus topics include an introduction to intrinsically disordered proteins and their role in misfolding diseases, the structural biology, ligand binding, and mechanisms of membrane bound enzymes, and mechanisms underlying the regulation of protein function and enzymes involved in cell signaling. Prerequisites: BIOCH 320, with a minimum grade of B- or consent of Department. This course is intended for students in Honors or Specialization in Biochemistry. Students in other programs may be admitted subject to availability and with the consent of the Department. Graduate students may not register for credit (see BIOCH 520).

BIOCH425 Proteomics Course Page

Description: An advanced course focusing on the analysis of protein function and protein-protein interactions within the context of the entire protein complement of a cell. Some aspects of protein structure as it pertains to the principles of protein-protein interactions will be covered along with genetic and biochemical methods for the analysis of protein complexes, protein interaction networks and system wide protein identification and dynamics. This course is intended for students in Honors or Specialization in Biochemistry. Students in other programs may be admitted subject to availability and with the consent of the Department. Prerequisites: BIOCH 320 and BIOCH 330 with a minimum GPA of 3.0 in these courses.

BIOCH430 Biochemistry of Eukaryotic Gene Expression Course Page

Description: The organization and expression at the molecular level of information encoded in the nucleic acids of eukaryotic cells. The focus will be on genome structure and the regulation of gene expression at the levels of transcription, post-transcriptional processing, translation, post-translational modification and protein sorting. Recombinant DNA technologies and genetic engineering will be discussed as methods for studying the cellular processing of genetic information. Prerequisites: BIOCH 320 and 330, both with a minimum grade of B- or consent of Department. This course is intended for students in Honors or Specialization in Biochemistry. Students in other programs may be admitted subject to availability and with the consent of the Department. Graduate students may not register for credit (see BIOCH 530).

BIOCH441 Structure and Function of Biological Membranes Course Page

Description: Survey of the structure and function of biological membranes. Topics include the structure, properties and composition of biomembranes, characterization and structural principles of membrane lipids and proteins, lateral and transverse asymmetry, dynamics, lipid-protein interactions, membrane enzymology, permeability, and biogenesis. Prerequisites: BIOCH 320, with a minimum grade of B- or consent of Department. This course is intended for students in Honors or Specialization in Biochemistry. Students in other programs may be admitted subject to availability and with the consent of the Department. Graduate students may not register for credit (see BIOCH 541).

BIOCH450 The Molecular Biology of Mammalian Viruses Course Page

Description: This course will focus on virus structure, replication, and interaction with host cells at the molecular level. Lytic viruses with single- or double-stranded DNA or RNA genomes will be discussed, as will the mechanisms of viral oncogenesis. Prerequisites: BIOCH 320 and 330, with a minimum grade of B- or consent of Department. This course is intended for students in Honors or Specialization in Biochemistry. Students in other programs may be admitted subject to availability and with the consent of the Department. Graduate students may not register for credit (see BIOCH 550).

BIOCH455 Biochemistry of Lipids and Lipoproteins Course Page

Description: Advanced course focusing on specific aspects of the regulation of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. Topics include the transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms governing the synthesis and degradation of important enzymes, lipids, and lipid transport molecules; the role of lipid mediators in signaling pathways and protein modification; the assembly and dynamics of lipoproteins and biological membranes; genetic disruptions of lipid regulatory proteins such as cell surface receptors leading to human disease. Prerequisites: BIOCH 310 with a minimum grade of B- or consent of Department. This course is intended for students in Honors or Specialization in Biochemistry. Students in other programs may be admitted subject to availability and with the consent of the Department. Graduate students may not register for credit (see BIOCH 555).

BIOCH465 Methods in Molecular Biophysics Course Page

Description: Survey of biophysical methods used in the characterization and structural determination of biological macromolecules, from ensemble measurements to single-molecule detection. Topics include mass spectrometry, optical spectroscopy, light microscopy, X-ray and neutron diffraction, electron microscopy, molecular dynamics and nuclear magnetic resonance. Emphasis is on using techniques in evaluating structure-function relationships through the discussion of representative macromolecular systems. Prerequisites: BIOCH 320 with a minimum grade of B- or consent of the Department. This course is intended for students in Honors or Specialization in Biochemistry. Students in other programs may be admitted subject to availability and with the consent of the Department. This course cannot be taken for credit if credit has already been obtained in BIOCH 460.

BIOCH481 Design and Construction of Synthetic Biological Systems I Course Page

Description: This course explores both the opportunities and challenges of synthetic life by providing a practical and theoretical introduction to this new discipline through lectures, class discussion, assigned reading and case studies. Topics covered include: natural vs artificial design of genetic circuits and devices, experimental aspects of gene and gene network construction, metabolic network design and evaluation, and the role of computer modeling in design creation, testing and optimization. The availability of BIOCH 481 to students from non-biochemistry backgrounds emphasizes the highly interdisciplinary nature of the field. Prerequisites: Registration in the Faculties of Science or Engineering and a minimum GPA 3.3 (or consent of the department).

BIOCH482 Design and Construction of Synthetic Biological Systems II Course Page

Description: Designed to prepare students for participation in the iGEM Competition (International Genetically Engineered Machines) through team-based problem solving. Teams composed of individuals from different programs are expected to: 1) Identify a relevant problem within the realm of synthetic biology. 2) Devise a credible and detailed plan to solve an aspect of the problem. 3) Demonstrate the feasibility of the design by computer modeling. 4) Evaluate the costs of success in terms of the financial, human and technological resources that are needed for the timely completion of the project. 5) Develop a plan to acquire the resources that are required for a successful outcome. 6) Produce a report and presentation. Although students are expected to exhibit a high level of independence and creativity, they can count on considerable guidance and support from participating faculty. Prerequisites: BIOCH 481 (or consent of the department).

BIOCH495 Special Topics in Biochemistry Course Page

Description: Covers specialized topics of current interest to advanced undergraduates in Biochemistry programs. Consult the Department for details about current offerings. Prerequisites: BIOCH 310, 320 and 330, and consent of the instructor. This course is restricted to students in Honors or Specialization in Biochemistry. Credit for this course may be obtained more than once.

BIOCH497 International Directed Research Project Course Page

Description: Supervised research within an international laboratory assigned by the Department of Biochemistry, to be carried out over one term (Spring or Summer). The results of the research project will be presented in an oral presentation. Can be taken as a science elective but not as a substitute for required courses in biochemistry. Can be taken for credit in addition to BIOCH 498 and BIOCH 499. Prerequisites: BIOCH 401 and consent of the Department.

BIOCH498 Directed Research Project Course Page

Description: Supervised research within a laboratory in the Department of Biochemistry, to be carried out over one term (Fall or Winter). The results of the research project will be presented in a short seminar. This course is intended for students in Honors or Specialization in Biochemistry. Students in other programs may be admitted subject to availability and with the consent of the Department. This course is not a substitute for required courses in Biochemistry. Can be taken for credit prior to BIOCH 499.

BIOCH499A Directed Research Project Course Page

Description: Supervised research within a laboratory in the Department of Biochemistry, to be carried out over both terms of Fall/Winter. The results of the research project will be presented in a final written report and an oral presentation. This course is required for the Honors program, but can be taken as a science elective by students in the Specialization program. Students in other programs may be admitted subject to availability. Prerequisites: BIOCH 401 and consent of the Department.

BIOCH499B Directed Research Project Course Page

Description: Supervised research within a laboratory in the Department of Biochemistry, to be carried out over both terms of Fall/Winter. The results of the research project will be presented in a final written report and an oral presentation. This course is required for the Honors program, but can be taken as a science elective by students in the Specialization program. Students in other programs may be admitted subject to availability. Prerequisites: BIOCH 401 and consent of the Department.

BIOCH510 Signal Transduction Course Page

Description: Principles of the biochemistry of cell communication and signal transduction through receptor activation, the generation of second messengers, and the control of protein modifications. The course will emphasize the mechanisms responsible for the regulation of cell migration, division and death. Prerequisites: BIOCH 310, 320 and 330, or BIOCH 203 and 205, all with a minimum grade of B-, or consent of the Department. Lectures are the same as for BIOCH 410, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. This course may not be taken for credit if credit has already been obtained in BIOCH 410.

BIOCH520 Protein Chemistry, Structure, and Function Course Page

Description: Protein chemistry and purification. The intra- and intermolecular forces that determine protein structure. Principles of protein folding and dynamics. Enzyme mechanisms and ligand binding interactions. Prerequisites: BIOCH 320, or BIOCH 203 and 205, all with a minimum grade of B- or consent of Department. Lectures are the same as for BIOCH 420, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. This course may not be taken for credit if credit has already been obtained in BIOCH 420.

BIOCH525 Proteomics Course Page

Description: An advanced course focusing on the analysis of protein function and protein-protein interactions within the context of the entire protein complement of a cell. Some aspects of protein structure as it pertains to the principles of protein-protein interactions will be covered along with genetic and biochemical methods for the analysis of protein complexes, protein interaction networks and system wide protein identification and dynamics. This course is intended for students in Biochemistry but students in other programs may be admitted subject to availability and with the consent of the Department. Prerequisites: BIOCH 420 and BIOCH 430 or their equivalent with a minimum GPA of 3.2 in these courses.

BIOCH530 Biochemistry of Eukaryotic Gene Expression Course Page

Description: The organization and expression at the molecular level of information encoded in the nucleic acids of eukaryotic cells. The focus will be on genome structure and the regulation of gene expression at the levels of transcription, post-transcriptional processing, translation, post-translational modification and protein sorting. Recombinant DNA technologies and genetic engineering will be discussed as methods for studying the cellular processing of genetic information. Prerequisites: BIOCH 320 and 330, or BIOCH 203 and 205, all with a minimum grade of B- or consent of Department. Lectures are the same as for BIOCH 430, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. This course may not be taken for credit if credit has already been obtained in BIOCH 430.

BIOCH541 Structure and Function of Biological Membranes Course Page

Description: Survey of the structure and function of biological membranes. Topics include the structure, properties and composition of biomembranes, characterization and structural principles of membrane lipids and proteins, lateral and transverse asymmetry, dynamics, lipid-protein interactions, membrane enzymology, permeability, and biogenesis. Prerequisites: BIOCH 320, or BIOCH 203 and 205, all with a minimum grade of B- or consent of Department. Lectures are the same as for BIOCH 441, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. This course may not be taken for credit if credit has already been obtained in BIOCH 441.

BIOCH550 The Molecular Biology of Mammalian Viruses Course Page

Description: This course will focus on virus structure, replication, and interaction with host cells at the molecular level. Lytic viruses with single- or double-stranded DNA or RNA genomes will be discussed, as will the mechanisms of viral oncogenesis. Prerequisites: BIOCH 320 and 330, or BIOCH 203 and 205, all with a minimum grade of B- or consent of Department. Lectures are the same as for BIOCH 450, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. This course may not be taken for credit if credit has already been obtained in BIOCH 450.

BIOCH555 Biochemistry of Lipids and Lipoproteins Course Page

Description: Advanced course focusing on specific aspects of the regulation of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. Topics include the transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms governing the synthesis and degradation of important enzymes, lipids, and lipid transport molecules; the role of lipid mediators in signaling pathways and protein modification; the assembly and dynamics of lipoproteins and biological membranes; genetic disruptions of lipid regulatory proteins such as cell surface receptors leading to human disease. Prerequisites: BIOCH 310 with a minimum grade of B- or consent of Department. Lectures are the same as for BIOCH 455, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. This course may not be taken for credit if credit has already been obtained in BIOCH 455.

BIOCH565 Methods in Molecular Biophysics Course Page

Description: Survey of biophysical methods used in the characterization and structural determination of biological macromolecules, from ensemble measurements to single-molecule detection. Topics include mass spectrometry, optical spectroscopy, light microscopy, X-ray and neutron diffraction, electron microscopy, molecular dynamics and nuclear magnetic resonance. Emphasis is on using techniques in evaluating structure-function relationships through the discussion of representative macromolecular systems. Lectures are the same as for BIOCH 465, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. This course cannot be taken for credit if credit has already been obtained in BIOCH 460 or 465.

BIOCH609 Macromolecular Structure Analysis Course Page

Description: Principles of X-ray crystallography as applied to the study of protein and nucleic acid structure. Practical aspects of diffraction and structure solution are demonstrated by a collaborative study of a suitable small molecule of biological interest. Designed for senior honors and graduate students. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Maximum enrolment of 10 students. Offered in alternate years.

BIOCH620 Selected Topics in Protein Structure, Function, and Regulation Course Page

Description: Directed reading and seminar course, based on papers taken from recent literature of protein research. Students critically discuss the papers and give oral presentations to the class. Designed for graduate students. Prerequisite: BIOCH 420 or equivalent, or consent of Department.

BIOCH623A Special Topics in Research on Polynucleotides Course Page

Description: This course is a journal club and discussion group in which current research topics on nucleic acids are discussed. Specific talks range from biochemistry, genetics and microbiology to nuclear biology and clinical aspects.

BIOCH623B Special Topics in Research on Polynucleotides Course Page

Description: This course is a journal club and discussion group in which current research topics on nucleic acids are discussed. Specific talks range from biochemistry, genetics and microbiology to nuclear biology and clinical aspects.

BIOCH626A Special Topics in Protein Research Course Page

Description: Seminar course for advanced students. Detailed consideration is given to recent advances in research on protein structure and function and mechanism of enzyme action. Prerequisite: BIOCH 420 or consent of Department.

BIOCH626B Special Topics in Protein Research Course Page

Description: Seminar course for advanced students. Detailed consideration is given to recent advances in research on protein structure and function and mechanism of enzyme action. Prerequisite: BIOCH 420 or consent of Department.

BIOCH630 Selected Topics in Modern Molecular Biology Course Page

Description: Directed reading and seminar course, based on papers taken from the recent literature of molecular biology. Students critically discuss the papers and give oral presentations. Note: designed for graduate students; offered yearly. Prerequisite: BIOCH 530 and consent of the Department.

BIOCH640A Special Topics in Research on Biomembranes Course Page

Description: Seminar course for advanced students covering selected topics from the current literature in the field of membrane structure and function. Prerequisite: BIOCH 441 or consent of Department.

BIOCH640B Special Topics in Research on Biomembranes Course Page

Description: Seminar course for advanced students covering selected topics from the current literature in the field of membrane structure and function. Prerequisite: BIOCH 441 or consent of Department.

BIOCH641 Selected Topics on the Structure and Function of Biological Membranes Course Page

Description: Directed reading and seminar course on the structure and function of biological membranes. Topics include membrane biogenesis, bioenergetics, transport and structural aspects of membrane lipids and proteins. Prerequisite: BIOCH 441 or consent of the Department.

BIOCH650A Signal Transduction Course Page

Description: A journal club and discussion group addressing topics in the general area of signalling mechanisms that control cell activation, growth, apoptosis and vesicle trafficking. Specific talks range from biochemistry, genetics and microbiology to molecular biology and clinical aspects. Prerequisite: BIOCH 410/510 or consent of Department.

BIOCH650B Signal Transduction Course Page

Description: A journal club and discussion group addressing topics in the general area of signalling mechanisms that control cell activation, growth, apoptosis and vesicle trafficking. Specific talks range from biochemistry, genetics and microbiology to molecular biology and clinical aspects. Prerequisite: BIOCH 410/510 or consent of Department.

BIOCH651A Special Topics in Lipid and Lipoprotein Research Course Page

Description: Seminar for advanced students covering selected topics from the current literature in the field of lipid and lipoprotein research. Prerequisite: BIOCH 555 or consent of Department.

BIOCH651B Special Topics in Lipid and Lipoprotein Research Course Page

Description: Seminar for advanced students covering selected topics from the current literature in the field of lipid and lipoprotein research. Prerequisite: BIOCH 555 or consent of Department.

BIOCH655 Advances in Lipid and Lipoprotein Research Course Page

Description: Recent developments and use of the current literature are emphasized. Topics include regulation of lipid metabolism, intracellular lipid trafficking, regulation of lipoprotein secretion, lipid transfer among lipoproteins, reverse cholesterol transport, and atherosclerosis. Prerequisite: BIOCH 455, or 555, or consent of Department. Offered in alternate years.

BIOCH670A Recent Advances in Biochemistry Course Page

Description: A seminar course on topics of current interest in biochemistry. Students will contribute to a presentation based on recent developments published in first rate journals. Attendance at all seminars is expected. Note: open only to graduate students in Biochemistry.

BIOCH670B Recent Advances in Biochemistry Course Page

Description: A seminar course on topics of current interest in biochemistry. Students will contribute to a presentation based on recent developments published in first rate journals. Attendance at all seminars is expected. Note: open only to graduate students in Biochemistry.

BIOCH671A Recent Advances in Biochemistry Course Page

Description: A seminar course on topics of current interest in biochemistry. Students will contribute a presentation on their research project that includes original data. Attendance at all seminars is expected. Prerequisite: BIOCH 670 or consent of the Department. Note: open only to graduate students in Biochemistry.

BIOCH671B Recent Advances in Biochemistry Course Page

Description: A seminar course on topics of current interest in biochemistry. Students will contribute a presentation on their research project that includes original data. Attendance at all seminars is expected. Prerequisite: BIOCH 670 or consent of the Department. Note: open only to graduate students in Biochemistry.

BIOCH675 Magnetic Resonance in Biology and Medicine II Course Page

Description: Designed for advanced honors and graduate students interested in the application of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to biological systems. Topics include quantum mechanical basis of NMR, multinuclear multidimensional NMR experiments, NMR relaxation theory, new NMR applications. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Offered in alternate years.

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