• Home   /  
  • Archive by category "1"

Black Ops 2 Guerrilla Warfare Assignment Of Mortgage

NYTimes.com Site Map

For a comprehensive guide to our site, please see the Site Index.

Subscribe to Read Articles from April 1950 Part 2

  • BUFFALO PLANS HOUSING; City Seeks Former War Plant for 1,500-Family Project
  • 5 STORES LEASED IN URIS BUILDING; Schrafft's Among Tenants Taking Space in 488 Madison Avenue--Other Renting
  • BRONX MORTGAGES FILED
  • REALTY FINANCING
  • Advertising News and Notes; Forums Planned on Business Accounts Personnel
  • Geyer, Newell & Ganger Names Aide to President
  • MANHATTAN MORTGAGES
  • MANHATTAN TRANSFERS
  • APARTMENT RENTALS
  • APARTMENT HOUSES CONVEYED IN BRONX; Properties on Andrews Avenue and Crotona Parkway Lead Trading in ...
  • COMMODITY INDEX UP; B.L.S. Reports Rise From 247.3 April 14 to 249.7 April 21
  • PROMOTION DRIVE SET BY UPHOLSTERY MEN
  • Blackstone to Expand Output
  • PAPERBOARD OUTPUT UP; 32.3% Rise in Week to April 22 Over Year Ago Reported
  • VOLUME INCRERSES IN KNITTED GOODS; Basis for Optimism Reported by the Director of National Outerwear ...
  • TRUCK GAINS LAID TO BETTER SERVICE; Industry Spokesman Asserts That Super-Highways Are Main Factor Is 'Myth'
  • BUSINESS NOTES
  • PAYMENTS REPORTS DUE; Employers Have Until Monday to File Under Disability Law
  • $50,000 A YEAR FOR CLAY; Retired General Would Be First Paid President of Radio Group
  • Sylvania Offers Small Sets
  • CLOSE PRICING URGED FOR DEFENSE BIDS
  • Business World; WHOLESALE COMMODITY PRICES Buyers' Total Lower Output Shift for Newsprint Darker Worsteds ...
  • BUSINESS RECORDS
  • ARRIVAL OF BUYERS
  • Utility Executive to Retire
  • FORD TO EXPAND IN CANADA; Will Spend $5,500,000 in Quest of Greater Business
  • 365 Life Insurance Companies Earn 3.04% On Investment in '49, Four-Year Record
  • ACTION TO REVERSE LIQUOR DROP URGED; Lourie Suggests $1,000,000 Daiquiri Promotion to Attain Goal to ...
  • Vice President Chosen By Gross Distributors
  • THIRD AVE. BUS LINE ANALYZES 10C FARE; Tells U.S. Court Rise Would Add $2,000,000--Sees Benefit in Decrease ...
  • EXECUTIVE CHANGES
  • REPUBLIC STEEL EARNINGS; Corporation Reports Net Profit of $16,621,334 for Quarter
  • Macy's Shifts Two Departments
  • INSURANCE CONCERN GAINS; Massachusetts Bonding Assets Increase $3,070,459 in Year
  • EDISON CO. CLEARS $2.46 A SHARE NET; Compares With $2.09 a Share for Previous Year--Other Utility Companies ...
  • JONES & LAUGHLIN STEEL; Good Year Is Forecast Despite the Effects of Coal Strike
  • NAVAL STORES
  • DAIRY PRODUCTS
  • Advanced to Presidency Of Northland Greyhound
  • RECORD 1949 MILK OUTPUT; State Cites 8,708,000,000 Pounds Despite Drought in Some Areas
  • INDUSTRIAL INJURIES DROP; Chrysler Medical Official Says They Are at All-Time Low
  • ASKS DEADLINE EXTENSION; Commerce Group Seeks U.S. Aid on New Costa Rican Debt Law
  • RUBBER OFF HERE AS IT RISES ABROAD; Hides Rally After Early Decline, Coffee Cheaper on Light Selling--Sugar ...
  • Skyes Heads Standish Fabrics
  • SOYBEANS REACT AFTER NEW HIGHS; Profit-Taking Brings Losses for Day in Chicago--Wheat Mixed, Corn Lower
  • RISE IN PEARL CULTURE; Importer Says Japan'a Output May Be 15% of Pre-War
  • 115,871 DU PONT OWNERS; Increase of 5,926 Since Jan. 1-- 17,000 Live in New York
  • Standard Director Nominated
  • Elected Vice President Of Commercial Solvents
  • PRICES OF COTTON CLOSE IRREGULAR; End Day 14 Points Up to 8 Off --Market Moves Up Early but Eases on ...
  • ALLEGHENY COUNTY GETS $7,770,000; Bonds Sold by Pennsylvania Division to Bankers--Other Municipal Financing ...
  • $6,669,188 CLEARED BY U.S. GYPSUM CO.; $4.08 a Share Earned in First Quarter Against $5,311,542, or ...
  • OIL HEATING GAINS CITED; Ricker Tells of New Techniques --Becker Managing Director
  • Former War Secretary Reserve Director Here
  • $10,000,000 for Family Finance
  • SNYDER RULES OUT NEW BORROWINGS; To Stick to $100,000,000 Bills Weekly--Sees Government 5.4 Billion ...
  • RAILROAD STATEMENTS
  • STOCK OFFER TODAY BY PHONE COMPANY; 16,500 Preferred Shares of Southwestern Associated on Market--Other ...
  • MONEY
  • Studebaker Shipments in Quarter Up 30%; $6,923,711, or $2.93 a Share, Also Earned
  • Railway Official Named Montreal Bank Director
  • Javits Will Speak at Ceremony
  • DIVIDEND NEWS; Deere & Co. Thompson Products United Gas Improvement Woodall Industries
  • BONDS AND SHARES ON LONDON MARKET; Rise in Price of Rubber Issues and Broadened Interest in Them Dominates ...
  • STAND-OFF MARKS CHANGES IN STOCKS; Advances Equal the Declines at 421, While Price Index Dips 0.16 Point ...
  • DOW SALES 10% HIGHER; Head of Chemical Company Sees Year's Earnings $5 a Share
  • HEAD OF U.S. STEEL CITES COMPETITION; Irving S. Olds Says Proposal to Break Down Operations Would Increase ...
  • Standard Railway Equipment
  • TOPICS OF THE DAY IN WALL STREET; Employe Trust Investments Eastern Steel Mill Equipment Certificates ...
  • THREE STATES IN BID TO GET NATURAL GAS
  • PHILLIPS SHOWS DROP; $1.66 Earnings in First Quarter Compares With $2.10 in '49
  • PICK-UP IN SPENDING SPARKS GAIN IN '50; Commerce Department Reports Sales Are Expected to Stay at High ...
  • Economic Report on Steel Is Held Boldest Free Enterprise Threat
  • Chronic Unemployment Predicted Due to Government's Price Policy; Johns-Manville Executive Tells Sales ...
  • GULF OIL INCOME OFF; $2.29 Share in Quarter Against $2.55 for 1949 Period
  • Steel Official Faces Justice Action Over Interlocking Directorships; Celler to Call Department's Attention ...
  • NEW SHARES VOTED AT I.B.M. MEETING; Increase in Company Capital Will Go Into Stock Dividends, Chairman ...
  • WIDE OPPOSITION TO EXCISE TAX SEEN; Revision Would Cause Gains in Business and Remove 'Pinch,' Survey Says
  • Sinclair Buys Into Coal Concern
  • $1.74 IS CLEARED BY TEXAS COMPANY; Earnings Decline From $2.09 a Share for 1949 Quarter, Stockholders ...
  • Tackle Signed by Lions
  • Hoover to Push Electric Irons
  • DU MONT PUTS OUT NEW VIDEO MODELS; 2 Units in New 'Interim' Line Reduced in Price Up to $60 From Sets ...
  • ORDERS IN FURNITURE DOWN 18% IN MONTH
  • STAGS' QUINTET GETS 10 PLAYERS IN DRAFT
  • FRANCE IS STRIVING TO DOUBLE EXPORTS; She Hopes to Achieve That Goal by 1953, Commercial Counselor Here ...
  • MAGNET, 9-10, WINS MARYLAND SPRINT; Favorite Defeats Little Harp by Two Lengths Over Muddy Track--Binky ...
  • Denies Poor Coffee Brewing
  • WOOD, FIELD AND STREAM
  • Forms Company to Make Garments of Plastic Film
  • Oma Outpoints Mitchell
  • BOLESLAVSKY TAKES HUNGARY CHESS LEAD
  • MRS. HERBERT'S 79 LOW GROSS IN GOLF; Old Oaks Star 5-Shot Winner --Mrs. Sulzberger Gets Net Prize in ...
  • Miss Kirk and Miss Lenczyk Advance North-South Golf; COMPETITORS IN WOMEN'S GOLF TOURNEY AT YONKERS
  • CARTIER IN RING TONIGHT; Meets Otis Graham in 10-Round Fight at St. Nicks
  • Price Simon Held at 3-1
  • Flying Missel and Honey's Gal Capture Feature Races at Jamaica; COMING DOWN THE STRETCH AT JAMAICA TRACK
  • DODD NEW ATHLETIC CHIEF; Georgia Tech Names Football Coach After Alexander Rites
  • OIL CAPITOL WORKS WELL; Goes 5 Furlongs at Keeneland-- Hill Prince Reaches Louisville
  • JERSEYS ROUT ROCHESTER; Little Giants Pound 3 Pitchers for 13-to-3 Triumph
  • HOUSTON GETS GARDELLA; Outfielder Sold by Cardinals-- Buffs Also Buy Kress
  • Giants, With Jansen in Box, Beat Phillies, 8-4, for First Victory; SCORING THE SECOND RUN FOR THE GIANTS ...
  • Sports of the Times; Is It His Kind of Team? Taking Dead Aim Daring Move The Guys Who Know High Praise
  • Fordham Nine to Play
  • TALBERT GAINS NET FINAL; Routs Sidwell in Italian Tennis --Drobny Also Advances
  • Addis Sent to Milwaukee
  • Raschi First Bomber to Go Route As Athletics Are Set Back by 6-3; Four Blows by Rizzuto and Pair of ...
  • MRS. THIERIOT'S 75 ANNEXES NET PRIZE; Mrs. Torgerson's 80 Ties for Low Gross on Long Island With Mrs. ...
  • Casagrande of Fordham Beats C.C.N.Y. With No-Hitter; SOPHOMORE FANS 14 AS RAMS WIN, 15-1 Casagrande ...
  • Minelli Victor Over Bazzano
  • RAINFALL DISRUPTS KEGLERS AT A.B.C.; Play on Some Alleys Hindered by Leaky Roof--Clark Gets 691 for ...
  • New York Skaters Lose
  • Heads Fordham Law Alumni
  • Moriarty Pitches No-Hitter
  • TIGERS TOP BROWNS IN NIGHT GAME, 5-2; Trucks Pitches 1-Hitter for 7 Innings--Groth's String Ends at ...
  • I.C.C. REFORM APPROVED; Committee Backs Truman Plan to Separate Functions
  • 90% OF THE DISABLED HELD TO BE TRAINABLE
  • Hatten's Two-Hitter Blanks Braves for Dodgers; Giants and Yankees Triumph; BROOKLYN ANNEXES FIFTH STRAIGHT, ...
  • CEILING' OPPOSED ON WASHINGTON SQ.; Commerce and Industry Unit Against Limiting Height of Buildings ...
  • ALLEN OUTPOINTS PRATESI IN LONDON; Captures European Flyweight Title in 15-Round Fight-- Romero Halts ...
  • Desses Midsummer Styles Join Slender Lines and Tiered Skirts; ALWYNN DRAMATIZES FABRIC Designer Uses ...
  • DIOR EXHIBITS IN LONDON; 92 Dress Styles, 8 Mannequins Leave Britons Breathless
  • Plaque to Honor Bates Urged
  • HANDPRINTED FABRIC SHOW; 3 Young Designers Exhibit the Products First Time Here
  • PSYCHOPATHS HELD RESPONSIVE TO AID; Rehabilitation of Emotionally Upset Children Is Described at Training ...
  • News of Food; Dinner Manager Wars on Chicken Patty: He's All for More Variety at Same Cost Why Customs ...
  • 2 HOUSES PUT UP IN STORE; They Are Among 8 to Be Shown at Macy's Starting Monday
  • New Fabrics From Europe Are Presented At the Remodeled Hambro House of Design
  • LAMP HAS FLOWER BASE; Crystal Bowl Allows Change in Decorative Effect
  • 'SEPARATES' VOGUE MAY SET A RECORD; THE FASHION OF SEPARATE PIECES, MADE FOR EACH OTHER, IN SUMMARY FABRICS
  • DR. SANDER EXPECTS TO RESUME IN JUNE; His Lawyer Says Revocation of License Is Considered a 2-Month ...
  • LARGEST LAKE SHIP ENDS FIRST VOYAGE; The Wilfred Sykes Ties Up at Indiana Harbor to Unload 165,500-Ton ...
  • Hats on to McMahon
  • RESIGNS POST AT SMITH; Miss Frances L. Rich to Leave Publicity Work for Sculpturing
  • NORFOLK GETS LEYTE JOB; Fight Lost to Have the Carrier Modernized in Brooklyn
  • BOY, 15, A SUICIDE; Patrolman's Son Was Worried About His School Marks
  • CHILD STUDY GROUP MAPS GREATER AID; Projects Include Expansion of Services and New Program of Training Leaders
  • G.O.P. Wins Wethersfield
  • First Company Formed to Can Fresh Milk Under a Process Discovered a Year Ago
  • Help for the Aged
  • WAR-RISK RATES CUT 50%; London Underwriters Reduce Japan shipping Charges
  • Shipping News and Notes; Maritime Association Here Elects Gehan President--Other Officials Chosen Seeks ...
  • ON THE RADIO
  • London-Cairo Flight Mark Set
  • OFF-SEASON PROFIT FOR AIRLINES SEEN; Vacations Under Union Pacts Open Up New Mass Market, Travel Forum Is Told
  • BRITISH SHIPYARDS REPORT DECREASE; Tonnage Under Construction in First Quarter of 1950 180,691 Below Year Ago
  • BABY BURIED AT SEA FROM ITALIAN LINER
  • MAGNUSON DOUBTS MARINE ACT POLICY; 6 Shipping Executives Testify at Washington Hearing on Maritime Affairs ...
  • ON TELEVISION
  • SHIPPING--MAILS; AlL HOURS GIVEN IN EASTERN STANDARD TIME Ships That Arrived Yesterday Incoming Passenger ...
  • DUAL BILL TO OPEN TONIGHT AT FULTON; Christopher Fry's 'A Phoenix Too Frequent' Will Follow Kenneth ...
  • U.S. COURT REFUSES TO STAY RENT LAW; Realty Operator Loses Plea to Bar Shift to State Supervision on May 1
  • Win Smith College Song Contest
  • DE SAPIO ASSAILED BY MARCANTONIO; Representative Charges Leader at Tammany Hall Attempted 'Back Door Dealings'
  • VOTE ORDERED AT R.C.A.; N.L.R.B. Poll to Decide Between Rival Electrical Unions
  • Radio and Television; C.B.S. to Present New Musical Variety Series Featuring Robert Q. Lewis
  • BUS THIEF SENTENCED; Ex-Convict Gets 18 Months for Stealing Broadway Vehicle
  • ILLINOIS GOVERNOR BACKS RENT CURBS; Stevenson Would Keep Federal Controls to Jan. 1, and Six Months ...
  • ROAD TROUPE A HIT IN 'SOUTH PACIFIC'; Janet Blair, Richard Eastham and Diosa Costello Top Cast in Cleveland ...
  • STATE HOUSING SET MARK LAST YEAR; 4,221 New Low-Income Homes Opened--Stickman Sees Even Wider Gains
  • Tonight's Music Events
  • VIVALDI FESTIVAL IS STARTED HERE; First of 2 Programs to Mark Composer's Birth Anniversary Presented ...
  • Toscanini and N.B.C. Symphony Warmly Received in New Orleans; Maestro Wins Acclaim of City for His Music ...
  • MUSICIANS' FUND CITED; Veterans Administration Honors It for Work in Past
  • THE THEATRE; Oh, Doctor!
  • Sonny Tufts Booked as Drunk
  • CANTATA SINGERS IN BACH'S PASSION; Arthur Mendel Leads Group in Performance at Church of the Heavenly Rest
  • A.N.T.A. Aids Air Force
  • Art Auction at Hunter
  • Friedberger Gives Recital
  • GRAHAM DANCERS WILL TOUR EUROPE; Company to Open on June 27 in Paris, Then Visit Other Centers on the ...
  • THE SCREEN IN REVIEW; Border Street,' Polish-Made Film Depicting Nazis' Purge of Warsaw Jews, Opens ...
  • JULIUS RUDEL DIRECTS CITY OPERA 'TURANDOT'
  • Lavery Play to Be Offered
  • IN LAST SIX WEEKS
  • Hunter Amateur Hour Today
  • Arts High School Doing Show
  • PARAMOUNT HALTS WORK ON NEW FILM; 'Keystone Girl' Is Postponed by Studio as Betty Hutton Objects to ...
  • 'DON CARLO' TO OPEN 'MET' SEASON NOV. 6
  • MUSIC PRIZES AVAILABLE; Ninth Annual Marian Anderson Scholarship Awards to Be Made
  • Premiere of Ward Play Delayed
  • FOR PROTESTANT MERGER; Foreign Missions Conference to Join National Council
  • OLD NEW YORK CARS CALLED A MENACE; More Than Half of Passenger Cars in City Are Dangerous, Conference ...
  • Scores View Whale on Beach
  • 2 BALLET GROUPS OFFER PREMIERES; Monte Carlo Company Gives 'Grand Pas Classique,' City Center Sees Taras Work
  • Austin--Pulliam
  • THOMAS WILT HEARD IN PROGRAM ON FLUTE
  • FINISHES HIS SPEECH AFTER HEART ATTACK
  • Tallulah Bankhead on Tour
  • FOUR GIRLS WHOSE ENGAGEMENTS ARE ANNOUNCED
  • TROTH ANNOUNCED OF MISS J.LEHRICH; Daughter of City Magistrate Will Be Married on May 17 to Herman David ...
  • RECEIVES NEW DEGREE; Naturalized Citizen Becomes a Master of Public Affairs
  • Mrs. Hollis Thayer to Entertain
  • LEAGUE OF VOTERS DIVIDES ON PLANS; Women's Convention Defeats Move to Put Civil Rights on Priority Program ...
  • JOAN GIBB FIANCEE OF M.N. WIDDIFIELD; Former Drama Student Is Prospective Bride of Aide of Advertising ...
  • Protest Opening of Fishing Site
  • Cortell--Rothschild
  • Bard's Folio Brings $575
  • BROOKLYN FUND DRIVE FOR $750,000 OPENS
  • MISS CECIL J. WIENER WED IN WEST ORANGE
  • Tea for St. Barnabas Aides
  • DORIS DOYLE TO BE WED; Aide of State Department Is Fiancee of Emerson Swartz
  • RUTH MERRILL ENGAGED; Bride-to-Be of Richard Hallstead --Both Attending Cornell
  • NANCY MARCIA BROWN TO BE BRIDE IN JUNE
  • Holmes--Bryan
  • Wadely--Wood
  • Show to Help Hebrew Home
  • Personal Notes
  • Card Party to Assist Hospital
  • ELLIN COSGROVE'S TROTH; New Rochelle Alumna Affianced to Joseph E. Carpenter
  • SCIENCE WRITERS RECEIVE AWARDS; WINS LASKER AWARD SCIENCE WRITERS RECEIVE AWARDS
  • $1.6 BILLION MOVED 5 MILES IN 5 HOURS; Mutual Life, Shifting Office, Sends Vast Treasure Over Heavily ...
  • RISES FOR 400 U.S. AIDES; Civil Service Commission Puts Top Men at $14,000
  • MARRIAGE MAY 20 FOR MISS KRIEGER; Summit Girl Will Have Sister as Honor Maid at Wedding to R.R. Cowan, ...
  • Davison Quits as History Museum Head; Acclaimed for His Service of 18 Years
  • GOVERNOR'S BID SPURNED; Kansas City Rabbi Will Testify on Police Only to Grand Jury
  • BRONK NAMED HEAD OF SCIENCE ACADEMY; HEADS SCIENTISTS SCIENCE ACADEMY ELECTS DR. BRONK The 30 Americans ...
  • FINED FOR SLOW DRIVING; Motorist Caused 4-Mile Traffic Snarl on Busy Route
  • MORGENTHAU IN HOSPITAL; Ex-Secretary of Treasury to Have Physical Check-Up
  • DURST IS RE-ELECTED; Heads the Hebrew Free Loan Society for Sixth Term
  • MRS. TRUMAN HAS A COLD; Cancels Engagements for Several Days--Illness 'Not Alarming'
  • NEW TB DRUG ANNOUNCED; Viomycin Is Found Effective 'to an Appreciable Degree'
  • Firemen Find 2,563 Violations
  • WILL FOUNDS ART UNIT; Collection Bequeaths $1,000,000 to San Antonio for Institute
  • Newsstand Bills Introduced
  • Photography an Exciting Hobby For Paraplegics Smitten by 'Bug'; PARAPLEGIC PATIENTS STUDY PHOTOGRAPHY
  • U.S. INDIANS SEEN GOING DOWNGRADE; Lawyer Says They Are Worse Off Now Than 130 Years Ago and Situation ...
  • Truman Plane to Go to London
  • Senate Subpoenas Issued For Adonis and Erickson
  • Dewey Sets Boys and Girls Week
  • Obituary 4 -- No Title
  • WEST DISPUTES EAST ON GERMAN WAR DEAD
  • Named by Cancer Committee
  • G.O.P. REFORM PLAN READY; Connecticut House Caucus to Consider Proposal Tomorrow
  • Obituary 5 -- No Title
  • Obituary 6 -- No Title
  • PENSION DRIVE ANALYZED; Change to Demand for Higher Pay Seen by Attorney
  • CITY URGED TO SPUR THEATRE BUILDING; 29 Changes in Code to Make Structures Pay Better Are Introduced ...
  • JOHN NOLAN DEAD; NOTED LAWYER, 57; Attorney General in 1939-48 of Rhode Island Formerly Was a State Senator
  • Academy Leave Bill Approved
  • Obituary 2 -- No Title
  • Obituary 3 -- No Title
  • Obituary 1 -- No Title
  • EX-CAPT. D.J. CAREY, POLICEMAN 41 YEARS
  • JUDGE SILBERMAN OF JERSEY BENCH; Member of District Court 18 Years, Civic Leader, Dies in Paterson at 47
  • HENRY HEIDE JR., WITH CANDY FIRM; Vice President and Son of the Company's Founder Dies in Hospital at ...
  • JOHN T. BUCKLEY
  • DR. JAMES T. HANAN, MONTCLAIR SURGEON
  • CHARLES H. HOUSTON, LAWYER AT CAPITAL
  • Birth Notice 1 -- No Title
  • MRS. B.W. ADAMS
  • DR. ALFRED J. SCHEDLER
  • Two Gamblers Released on Bail
  • FRANCIS J.C. DONOHUE
  • RABBI JULIEN WEILL
  • RAYMOND W. DUNING
  • GEORGE W. SEILER
  • COUNT OF ALMUDENA
  • 26 Graduated as Nurses
  • WILLIAM A. DUNCAN
  • MRS. HARRY V. LYONS
  • CHARLES J. LEACH
  • WILLIAM NEUHS
  • PIETRO G. GHILONI
  • JOHN P. COYLE
  • MRS. HERMAN C. SCHIPPER
  • HERMAN E. ZEPF
  • MRS. ETHEL ZUKOWSKY
  • RICHARD L. MOYLE
  • MRS. WALTER J. BOSTOCK
  • GEORGE G. LYON
  • BENJAMIN F. DECKER
  • LOUIS GOLDSTEIN
  • PRINCE M. MELIKOFF
  • JONATHAN H. JONES
  • A.P. M'DOUGALL
  • CHARLES WESTER
  • T. JOSEPH COGGINS
  • CHARLES D. SPROULE
  • ALFORD E. HOWARD
  • JOHN W. WESTCOTT
  • Abroad; Creating a Board of Strategy for the Cold War Too Much Static Thinking The Big Question
  • GEORGE W. BOOKER
  • CESAR A. BARRANCO
  • THE CITY BUDGET GROWS
  • Letters to The Times; Pattern in Indonesia Menace to Federated States Seen in Program of Jogjakarta ...
  • THE TURKISH BULWARK
  • FRED M. STEIN DIES; WELFARE LEADER; Founder of Committee for Care of Jewish Tuberculosis Was Ex-Banker ...
  • Topics of The Times
  • KARACHI CONFERENCE
  • MUSEUM IN BOSTON FINDS MASTERPIECE; 18 Months of Work on SootCovered Canvas Yields 1570Painting by Tintoretto
  • TELEPHONE STRIKE POSTPONED
  • AWARD TO MISS LENROOT
  • HOW NOT TO STOP GAMBLING
  • Books Published Today
  • Events Today
  • DISPUTE IN GERMANY
  • Dewey to Be Host to 'Survivors'
  • Books--Authors
  • FAULKNER TO RECEIVE THE HOWELLS MEDAL; WINS HOWELLS MEDAL
  • DIRTY STREETS DEPLORED; Situation Discussed at Rally of Cleanliness Association
  • Nursery School Plans Reception
  • 'COLD CIVIL WAR' HELD PERIL TO U.S.; Teachers Are Told Democracy Is Endangered by Threat of Slander ...
  • AT YESTERDAY'S BANSHEE LUNCHEON AT THE WALDORF
  • 'Career Clinics' Begin
  • 7TH TEACHER STAYS SILENT; Head of Union Is Questioned on Communist Membership
  • CHRYSLER UNION ASKS STRIKE-AID EXTENSION
  • SCHOOLS ARE URGED TO LIFT NATION BAN; Miss Kirchwey, the Editor, Makes Appeal to Board of Superintendents Here
  • Books of the Times; Adventures Minus Excitement In Two Raids on Bengazi
  • GEORGE I. KRAM ENDS LIFE; New York Advertising Man Is Found at Chappaqua Home
  • CITY WATER BOARD BARS DEWEY PLAN; Rejection as Unsatisfactory Is Revealed at Hearing on Bid to Build ...
  • ASKS 2D-CLASS MAIL RISE; Donaldson Tells Senators Most of Postal Deficit Is Involved
  • M'LEAN RE-ELECTED PRESIDENT OF A.P.; Dolph Simons, Mark Ethridge Are Vice Presidents--Four New Directors ...
  • ENGINEERS, NETWORKS REACH AN AGREEMENT
  • INDUSTRIAL AWARD MADE; Research Body Presents Medal Posthumously to Jewett
  • The Water Situation
  • City's Rainmakers Spraying Clouds Again With Silver Iodide Smoke Over Watershed
  • Wagner to Address Catholics
  • CAPITAL JURY GETS MARAGON CASE TODAY
  • Today's Press Program
  • NEHRU VOICES HOPE FOR JOINT POLICIES; Says India and Pakistan Should Draw Closer on Economic and Defense ...
  • CONGRESS PICTURED AS AID TO LOBBIES; C.I.O. Official Tells Inquiry Mailing Privilege Was Used for Real ...
  • Church to Mark Anniversary
  • Fire Razes Topeka's Throop Hotel
  • Poles Build Biggest Foundry
  • New Gain in India-Pakistan Amity On Eve of Nehru-Liquat Parley; Details of Trade Pact, Breaking 7-Month ...
  • The proceedings In Washington
  • ECONOMY HIT AGAIN IN ACTION BY HOUSE; Bipartisan Vote to Restore Cut Gives Truman All He Asked for Hospital ...
  • ASSAULT ON CHUSAN BY REDS HELD NEAR; Peiping Reported Massing Men and Boats for Invasion of Nationalist ...
  • Women Democrats' Head to Hold Schools Across Nation on Issues; Mrs. Edwards Picks Brannan Plan, Health ...
  • East Turks Ignore Moves by Soviet, Talking Politics and Rain Instead; Says Soviet Move Will Fall Democrats ...
  • Duke to Buy Speedy Car
  • MANILA IMPORT BILL DRAWS U.S. PROTEST
  • NARCISSUS DISPLAY GETS UNDER WAY; PRIZE WINNER AT ANNUAL NARCISSUS SHOW
  • BEN-GURION WARNS ZIONISTS ON RULE; Tells World Leaders That Aid Does Not Entitle Foreigners to Voice ...
  • TEACHER 'STRIKE' STIRS BOARD HEAD; BROOKLYN STUDENTS ASK MORE PAY FOR TEACHERS
  • Catholics Protest to Budapest
  • VATICAN FORESEES POLISH PACT DELAY; Officials Doubt Church-State Final Accord Will Be Signed Without ...
  • JORDAN TELLS U.N. OF ANNEXING MOVE; Step Viewed as Blow to Plan to Internationalize Jerusalem --Peace ...
  • TOKYO SAID TO SEEK AUSTERITY EASING; Finance Minister on Way to U. S., Reportedly With Plea on Debt ...
  • Argentina Bans Geography Book
  • London and Paris Have Snow
  • RIGHT TO PETITION IN U.N. SEEN WEAK; Jewish Congress Spokesman Says U.S.-British Proposal Skimps on ...
  • Queen to Visit Northern Ireland
  • LIBERALS JOIN FOES OF CRIPPS' BUDGET; Party Decision to Vote Today With Opposition Puts Labor Tenure ...
  • PLASTIRAS' PROGRAM HIT; Populist and Left-Wing Chiefs Assail Greek Premier
  • Belgian Reds Foment Riots
  • 48,000 IN SCOTLAND VOTE IN CLOSE RACE; Result Will Not Be Known in Time for Victor to Join in Commons ...
  • TWO CORRESPONDENTS ARRESTED IN RUMANIA
  • NEW SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED NEGROES; OFFERS FELLOWSHIPS
  • Nokrashy Pasha's Killer Hanged
  • Pay Rise Urged in Puerto Rico
  • GERMANS TO YIELD ON TAX LAW DRAFT; GERMAN LEGISLATORS CALL ON THE VICE PRESIDENT
  • The Proceedings In the U.N.
  • First Time, U.N. Authorities Say
  • MORE DOCKERS OUT IN LONDON SIRIKE; Number Quitting Work Grows, Overbalancing New Troops Government Brings In
  • U.N. CHARTER VOIDS A CALIFORNIA LAW; Appellate Court Holds Curb on Land Ownership by Japanese Is Violation ...
  • G.I. Renews Unity Pledge Made to Russians on Elbe
  • U.N. STILL BEST HOPE OF MAN, PRICE SAYS; Acting Chief Concedes 'Great Strains' on World Body, but Holds ...
  • African Rat Susceptible to Polio
  • 24 Die in Kenya Outbreak
  • U.S. Ex-Aide in Prague Sees Hate Line Failing
  • 1ST FOOD SHIPMENT READY FOR BERLIN; SENDING FOOD TO THE PEOPLE OF BERLIN
  • Clashes Mark Day in Italy
  • EAST INDONESIA TO END; Parliament Takes Step Toward Absorption by Republic
  • ISRAEL ACCUSES BRITAIN; Says London Provokes Arms Race in the Middle East
  • Jaffa Evacuation Ordered
  • New Chinese Envoy in Cuba
  • East Germans Demand West Berlin Entry, Insisting Youth Meeting Will Be Peaceful
  • WORLD TRADE PLEA PUT TO HOUSE GROUP; 2 Industrial Leaders Assert Havana Charter Is Vital to Democratic ...
  • FOR MIXED SHRINES UNIT; Church of Scotland Group Urges Interfaith Jerusalem Body
  • CIVILIANS TRAINING IN ATOM DETECTION; Technicians Named by States Taking Courses--These Will Instruct ...
  • FAROUK WEDDING DENIED; Palace Official Calls Reports Inaccurate Speculation
  • CZECHS SAY U.S. GIVES ASYLUM TO CRIMINALS
  • U.S. SENDS PROTEST TO MEXICO ON SHIPS; Ambassador Questions Validity of Seizure of 5 Shrimpers --Crewmen ...
  • AIRPLANE WHEEL FOUND IN BALTIC; Swedes Report Part of Aircraft With U.S. Markings Bears Bullet Holes ...
  • CHILE'S PRESIDENT HOPEFUL ON COPPER; COPPER MEN ENTERTAIN CHILEAN PRESIDENT
  • Seoul Mops Up Guerrillas
  • Finland Signs Trade Terms
  • South Pacific Islanders Open First 'Parliament'
  • Caracas Newspaper Suspended
  • Acheson Urged to Aid Vogeler
  • BRITISH NEED OF AID IS DOUBTED BY TAFT; Senator Attacks Marshall Plan Estimates as 'Vaguest Ever,' Demands ...
  • ADLER-DRAPER SUIT OPENS IN HARTFORD; Harmonica Player and Dancer Deny They Are 'Supporters' of 'Communist ...
  • C.V.WHITNEY ASKS WIDER 'RISK' TESTS; Resigning Cabinet Aide Lists 'Company They Keep' as Point For Security ...
  • 20 ARE SENTENCED FOR WELFARE ROW; LIBEL SUIT DEFENDANT
  • RED TEST CASE PLANNED; House Committee in Move on Recalitrant Witnesses
  • Senate Confirms Myer, Noonan
  • SEAWAY 'OVERDUE,' ACHESON TESTIFIES; He Tells House Group Project Is as Essential to Canada as It Is ...
  • BELLA DODD TERMS BUDENZ 'DISHONEST'; ASSAILS BUDENZ
  • World News Summarized
  • U.S.SEEKS NEW WAY TO TIE BONN REGIME TO ATLANTIC GROUP; Considers Giving the Germans Bigger Foreign-Policy ...
  • Kidnapped Baby Found Thriving In Improvised Incubator in Hotel; KIDNAPPED INFANT IS FOUND THRIVING Doctor ...
  • PRESS GETS APPEAL TO GUARD LIBERTIES; Dwight Warns Anti-Democratic Propaganda Seeks to Set Up 'Government ...
  • BELGIAN KING BARS PLEDGE TO DEPART; Leopold Angrily Brushes Off Demand for Guarantee He Let Prince Alone ...
  • Professor Kills College President, Another on Staff and Then Himself; COLLEGE HEAD AND PROFESSOR SLAIN
  • 'ATOMIC' SUBMARINE, 25 OTHER PROJECTS, ASKED BY SHERMAN; TELLS NAVY'S NEED FOR MODERN ARMS 'ATOM SUBMARINE' ...
  • M'CARTHY ASSERTS BUDENZ NAMED RED IN ACHESON OFFICE; Senator Says Witness Related in Closed Hearing ...
  • Gambling Raid Leaks Laid To One of McDonald Aides; GAMING SUSPECTS GOT TIPS ON RAIDS
  • Czech Cabinet Shift Assigns Defense to Soviet Stalwart; CHANGE JOBS IN PRAGUE
  • Apartment Service Strike Set For 'After 5:45 P.M. Today'; Union Announces Its Plans for Walkout in 2,000 ...
  • PHONE STRIKE OFF; DISPUTANTS NEAR FORMULA FOR PEACE; Agreement in Principle Reached in Long Lines Department, ...
  • Dry Day Tomorrow; Danger Signal Cited
  • Hotel Is Sold in Syracuse
  • APARTMENT RENTALS
  • RENT SUITES FROM PLANS; 140 Taken in First Sections of Floral Park Development
  • BRONX MORTGAGES FILED
  • Gets School Contract in Bronx
  • REALTY FINANCING
  • U.S. PLYWOOD SELLS NEW ROCHELLE PLANT
  • MANHATTAN TRANSFERS
  • Macy's Advances D.L. Yunich
  • REAL ESTATE NOTES
  • WEST SIDE HOUSE IN NEW OWNERSHIP; Remodeled Suites on 9th Ave and Apartments in Bronx Among Deals Reported
  • United States Supreme Court
  • BUSINESS LEASES
  • 'Co-op' Apartments Sold
  • BUILDING PLANS FILED
  • In Charge of Purchasing At Park Sheraton Hotel
  • TRANSFERS IN THE BRONX
  • Diesel Electric President Heads Queens Chamber
  • Week's Business Failures Off
  • Textile School Council Elects
  • SUNBEAM WINS ORDER ON FAIR TRADE PRICES
  • ARRIVAL OF BUYERS
  • Davies to Speak to Exporters
  • To Modernize Brass Mill
  • BUSINESS RECORDS
  • MALVERNE CORNER TAKEN FOR STORES; Investors Acquire Land from Catholic Church--Houses in Other Long ...
  • PERSONNEL AWARD MADE; Texas Company Vice President Honored for Achievement
  • Heads New Jersey Unit Of Certified Accountants
  • BUSINESS WORLD; Store Sales Here Down 2%
  • BUSINESS NOTES
  • SPEEDIER DEVICES FOR KNITTING SEEN; Equipment Worth $2,000,000 Shown at Crafts Exposition by 100 Manufacturers
  • Advertising News and Notes; Agency Offers Display Plan
  • PRESSURE COOKER WINS SAFETY PRIZE; 9 Other Products to Relieve Perils of Home Life Receive Lewis & ...
  • 2 TO 20 POINT RISE IN COTTON FUTURES; Afternoon Rally Sends Prices Up $2 a Bale From Lows-- Much Local ...
  • PACKAGING EXHIBITS STRESS USE OF COLOR
  • FURNITURE SETS FOR $198 IN FRONT; Best Selling Retail Price Last Year Duplicated '48 Figure, National ...
  • PRICES UNCHANGED ON BOYS' CLOTHING; Manufacturers Are Optimistic Over Prospects for season at Market ...
  • BOND REDEMPTIONS
  • L.I. LIGHTING CASE IS WON BY S.E.C.; U.S. Court of Appeals Upholds Power of Commission to Stop Fund ...
  • DAIRY PRODUCTS
  • T.L. Watson Admits Syme
  • Week's Steel Index Rises
  • COAL INDUSTRY AID ASKED; Electric Power Official Seeks Help in Socialism Fight
  • RUBBER ADVANCE FOLLOWED BY DROP; Market Here Closes 95 to 130 Points Above Last Week-- Late Rally in Coffee
  • DIVIDEND NEWS
  • LIVESTOCK IN CHICAGO
  • SOYBEAN PRICES SOAR IN CHICAGO; May, July Positions Up Limit of 10c a Bushel--Strength Spreads to Wheat, Corn
  • Canada Steel Profits Soar
  • CITIZENS UTILITIES EARNS RECORD NET; $522,688 Income for 1949 Is at Highest Level Fourth Year in Row--Other ...
  • Venezuela Refining Opening
  • HEADS CURTIS PUBLISHING; MacNeal Succeeds Fuller, Who Becomes Board Chairman
  • SUE ILLINOIS CENTRAL ON DIVIDEND ARREARS
  • OTHER UTILITY REPORTS
  • NEW HAVEN CUT UPHELD; Court Refuses to Review Ruling Reducing Passenger Service
  • Named U.S. Steel Executive
  • Advanced to Presidency Of Electric Machinery Co.
  • 250,075 G.E. STOCKHOLDERS; 82% Are Reported Individuals --189 Gain Since March 18
  • REYNOLDS METALS CO.; First-Quarter Profit Off to $1,454,257, or $1.11 a Share
  • RECORD YEAR FOR KELLOGG; Profit $5.28 a Share for 1949 Compared With $4.35
  • OTHER CORPORATE REPORTS
  • GAIN FOR SOAP COMPANY; Colgate-Palmolive-Peet Earns Net of $3,676,918 in Quarter
  • $2,000,000 Bond Sale by Utility Authorized By S.E.C., Also Approving Other Financing; Union Producing Company
  • NATIONAL AIRLINES GAINS; Quarter Earnings of $1,043,313 Compare With $717,929
  • REYNOLDS METALS CO.; $1,454,257 Net for First Quarter Compared With $3,320,579
  • TEXAS GULF SULPHUR CO.; $1.92 a Share for First Quarter Compares With $1.90
  • INCOME INCREASED BY PHILIP MORRIS; Net for Year Ended in March Is Equal to $7.26 a Share-- Stock Sale Proposed
  • KIMBERLY-CLARK CORP.; Net for Quarter $1.82 a Share Compared With 90 Cents
  • Russell Heads Kewanee Boiler
  • General Mills to Redeem Issue
  • Elected Vice President Of Kaiser-Frazer Corp.
  • COTTON EXCHANGE SLATE; Moore Nominated for President --Election Set for June 5
  • Esso to Raise Gasoline Price
  • STEEL OUTPUT DUE TO SET NEW RECORD; This Week's Production, at a Rate of 100.3, Expected to Yied 1,912,000 ...
  • MONEY
  • FIRST BANK STOCK CORP.; Minneapolis Institution Reports 55c a Share Net in Quarter
  • Utility to Market Preferred
  • BANK NOTE
  • U.S. GOVERNMENT AND AGENCY BONDS
  • BOSTON OFFERING NOTE ISSUE TODAY; $5,000,000 Total Dated May 1 and Is Due on Nov. 9--Other Municipal ...
  • GAS RATE STUDIED; F.P.C. Investigates Southern Tier Sales to Bath, N.Y.
  • Gets Oil Research Post
  • FAIRLESS DENIES PACT; Says U.S. Steel Is Not Part of Cartel, Doesn't Plan to Be
  • BONDS AND SHARES ON LONDON MARKET; Rubber Stocks, Following the Commodity, Lead Activity-- Rise in Government ...
  • DIVIDENDS ANNOUNCED
  • GAS RIGHTS IN OHIO SUBJECT OF HEARING
  • POWER CO-OPS' RULE BY HOLDING UNIT SEEN
  • PUBLIC AUTHORITY BONDS
  • PLAN TO REVAMP C.N.R. IS ASSAILED; Reorganization Proposal Could Be Disastrous, Morgan Stanley Partner Says
  • NATIONAL BANK NET RISES 40 MILLIONS; Dividends Take 43% of Profit, Remainder Being Retained in Capital Funds
  • 'FLASH' OF SELLING CUTS STOCK PRICES; Heavy Pressure Put on Market in 15 Minutes of Forenoon-- Aircrafts ...
  • Summary of the Day
  • Coffee Seat Price Unchanged
  • Harvard Dean Is Elected Ford Company Director
  • Utility Calts Preferred Stock
  • TOPICS OF THE DAY IN WALL STREET; Utility Leader's Views
  • RAILROAD EARNINGS
  • WINS HIGH COURT PLEA IN BANK TRUST CASE
  • UTILITY OFFERING ON MARKET TODAY; Texas Power & Light Preferred Shares to Pay $4--Other Company Financing
  • COFFEE MEN MOVE TO STEM SALES DIP; Program Announced to Halt Restaurant Dilution to Bar Serious Injury ...
  • OTHER COMPANY MEETINGS; Allied Chemical and Dye
  • OUTLOOK IS GOOD, SEARS HEAD FINDS; Gen. Wood Tells Stockholders April Sales Will Decline, but Profits ...
  • TREASURY STATEMENT
  • EXHIBIT ON 'MORE POWER TO AMERICA' TRAIN
  • PUBLICKER INDUSTRIES, INC.; Profit Reported for Quarter, Against $401,283 Loss in '49
  • Cooper-Bessemer Elects Oberlin Head as Director
  • STEEL CARTEL SEEN RIDDLING OUR POLICY; U.S. Steel, Bethlehem, Republic Are Accused of UnderminingMarshall ...
  • OIL HEATER SALES EXPECTED TO SOAR; Institute President at Opening of Convention Sees Volume Over 700,000 ...
  • COLBY CONQUERS YALE, 6-2; Eli Nine Gets 3 Hits, Makes Five Errors in 4th Defeat
  • TALBERT AND PATTY WIN; Gain Semi-Finals in Rome Tennis --Misses Moran-Scofield Bow
  • CONACHER RESIGNS POST; Chicago Six to Retain Former Manager in Advisory Role
  • COLLINS TOPS ALL-EVENTS; North Tonawanda Kegler Rolls 1,893 in A.B.C. Tourney
  • Bank Account Wins Rosedale Stakes by Neck at Jamaica; SWINGING INTO THE HOMESTRETCH IN THE FEATURE HERE
  • WOOD, FIELD AND STREAM; Lurking Areas for Trout
  • GRAZIANO WINS IN THIRD; Stops Danny Williams With Barrage to Face and Head
  • 91-DAY BILLS AT 99.705; Average Price Equal to Annual Discount Rate of 1.66%
  • Finch Takes British Title
  • ELECTRIC EXHIBITS ON G.E. TRAIN HERE; Industrial Marketing Project Started on Nation-Wide Tour at Grand ...
  • Grace Lenczyk Takes Medal in Pinehurst Golf; HARTFORD PLAYER LEADS QUALIFIERS Miss Lenczyk's 2-Under-Par ...
  • Sports of the Times; The Old Guard Passes
  • Takes Quarterhorse Title
  • SOUTH SHORE SAILORS LIST RACING DATES
  • New York Skaters Lose
  • 3 FIVES QUIT N.B.A.; PLAN RIVAL CIRCUIT; Denver, Sheboygan, Waterloo Withdraw, Name Moore to Head Proposed ...
  • BROWN NAMES ZITRIDES; Line Coach Is Picked as the Head Football Mentor
  • Sports Today
  • N.Y.U. STARS SET FOR PENN RELAYS
  • AFTER FINAL PLAY-OFF AGAINST RANGERS; RED WINGS TOAST WITH STANLEY CUP
  • INGLIS HEADS MET. P.G.A.; Elected President for 23d Time --Opening Tourneys Monday
  • Major League Baseball
  • SCHOOLBOY FANS 25; Cassidy, Woonsocket, Allows One Hit, Winning 13-0
  • BRONSTEIN BOWS IN CHESS; Stahlberg Wins in 8th Round of Tournament at Budapest
  • American League Is Not of Affected By New Balk Rule, Says Harridge; Always Required Full Stop by Pitchers, ...
  • Giants, Phils Hold Light Drills As Rain, Cold Postpone Contest
  • FUSARI TO BOX MAY 12; Faces Young at Garden Opening --Cartier Fights Tomorrow
  • SCARBOROUGH WINS FOR SENATORS, 3-0; Holds Red Sox to 3 Hits, All by Zarilla--Papai Victim of 8th-Frame ...
  • COLLEGE GAMES PUT OFF; Two of 3 Conference Contests Washed Out Are Rescheduled
  • D'Andrea Main Bout Victor
  • Airline Would Serve Utica
  • AFTER HITTING PITCHER SCORED SHUT-OUT TRIUMPH; LANIER STOPS REDS WITH HIT IN 9TH, 1-0
  • SHIPPING--MAILS; ALL HOURS GIVEN IN EASTERN STANDARD TIME
  • Dodgers Beat Braves With Two Runs on Error in Seventh; BROOKLYN IS VICTOR OVER BOSTON, 6 TO 4 Dodgers ...
  • TV IN WEST STARTS AIR FREIGHT BOOM; Tonnage at Chicago Expected to Go Above Present Level, Called Highest ...
  • DE-ICING SYSTEM FOR JETS; Development May Sour Use of Such Craft for Airlines
  • Development of North Port
  • Liner Arrives With Polar Bear
  • REYNOLDS TO MISS ATHLETICS' SERIES; Yanks' Right-Hander Hindered by Sore Arm--Raschi Set to Face Philadelphia ...
  • 3 LAKE SHIPS ICE-BOUND
  • U.S. STAYS ON IN BASES NEEDED BY AIRLINE
  • SHIPPING SEEN LAX IN PROMOTION JOB; Cuba Mail Official Says Poor Public Relations Have Been Costly to Industry
  • 12 U.S. SHIP LINES DENY HIGH PROFITS; File Certified Earnings Account With Senate Group to Deride Reports ...
  • Aviation News and Notes; Pan American Adopts New Vertical Stands in Handling 5,000-Pound Engines
  • Captain Gets Annual Award
  • ON THE RADIO
  • Dodwell Offices Are Moved
  • ON TELEVISION
  • Nassau Attorney Named
  • Galveston Seeks Sea Wall Funds
  • AIR BASE JOB CUT ORDERED; Dismissal of 100 Civilians Set at Stewart Field, Newburgh
  • PLEA FOR SEAWAY MADE BY SAWYER; Secretary Tells House Hearing 'Compelling' Reasons Call for Its Construction
  • ACTS IN ALABAMA ATTACKS; Birmingham Post Offers $500 for Tips on 7 Dynamitings
  • SENATOR SCORES PLAN TO CHANGE 4 AGENCIES
  • PROGRESS OF CENSUS PLEASES FIELD CHIEF
  • SUES MEYERS FOR DIVORCE; Wife of Imprisoned General Files Action in Virgin Isles
  • Meyer Girl's Condition Good
  • French Consul in Farewell Call
  • GAMBLER RECEIVES SIX-MONTH TERM; Employe Gets 90 Days on Their Conviction for Conspiracy to Violate ...
  • 3 LOST BOYS FOUND AFTER DAY IN CAVE; 'Just Sat Around and Prayed,' They Report After 24 Hours in West ...
  • GREYHOUND HOLDS TO TERMINAL PLAN; Carrier Sees Loss to City From Ban on Enlargement and Garage in 34th Street
  • New Post Office Finance Head
  • Radio and Television; A.B.C. Video Network to Offer Variety Show Honoring Nation's Song Writers Each Week
  • POLICY GUIDE ISSUED FOR PARENTS' GROUPS
  • KELLEMS SUIT END HINTED; U.S. Attorney Says He Will Ask Tax Action Dismissal
  • SAYS DIET ERA IS PASSING; Bakers' Leader Sees End to 'Fad' That 'Victimized' Them
  • A COURT FOR REMOVAL OF U.S. JUDGES URGED
  • NOVELTY IS ATTAINED IN FLOWER DISPLAYS
  • Fund Drive Leader Named
  • PSYCHIATRIC JOB SEEN IN NEW YORK SEX LAW
  • CALIFORNIA STYLES SHOWN BY GIMBELS; THE SAILOR DRESS
  • Girl Eager to Make Own Clothes Can Find What She Needs at Macy's Fabric Center
  • News of Food; Flavorful Patty-Franks Can Be Served With Eggs at Breakfast, or Beans at Lunch
  • PENN STATE EXPLAINS; Denies Lorch Was Dropped for Giving Negroes Apartment
  • N.Y.U. Club to Honor Professor
  • OPENING $8,000,000 DRIVE HERE YESTERDAY; $8,000,000 DRIVE ON FOR NEW YORK FUND
  • DEAN SOMMER HONORED; New Jersey Will Place Portrait of Law Expert in Capitol
  • Visitors Tour Mental Hospital
  • 2 SCIENTISTS DECRY ACTH SUBSTITUTES; Items Related to Cortisone Also Called Ineffective in Arthritis ...

Of all the social deviations that came into prominence during the 20th century, none arguably reflected the troubled history of human relations more than genocide on a mass scale. The Armenian genocide, the Nazi Holocaust of World War II, the “killing fields” of Cambodia, and the Rwandan massacre are simply the best known of these scars on the history of mankind. Many others are simply forgotten or unknown. This is a story about one of those genocides, its victims, and the small group of Americans still trying to make it right for the Montagnards of Vietnam’s Central Highlands: Save the Montagnard People, Inc.

MEMORIES AND BEGINNINGS

The history of the Montagnards began in the Central Highlands of what is the modern-day Socialist Republic of Vietnam (SRV). Referred to as Montagnard country (pronounced Mon-tahn-YARD, as deemed by the French colonials, meaning “Highlanders” – the tribesmen themselves use the term “Dega,” a combined term referring to their versions of Adam and Eve), this area was the ancestral home to a collection of different tribes that generally lived in harmony within the lush jungle and nearby farmland. During the period of French colonization in Indochina, the Montagnard tribes, a Christian (primarily Protestant) people, were given a degree of political autonomy. Sadly, it did not last.

In 1954, following the victory at Dien Bien Phu by the Viet Minh, Vietnam was partitioned and the Central Highlands were turned over to the new South Vietnamese government (the Republic of Vietnam [RVN]). Soon, the RVN began to usurp the Montagnards’ newly won political freedom. Montagnard languages began to be replaced by Vietnamese in the schools, and encroaching ethnic Vietnamese also informed them that to practice Christianity was illegal and that they would face persecution if they continued. The RVN government, which was heavily pro-Catholic, failed to stop the persecution, and in addition, the Montagnards were directly in the path of the early intrusions of North Vietnamese communist soldiers into South Vietnam. In response to all these threats, the Montagnard tribes began to form minority militant alliances with one another, along with militia troops for their common defense.

COMRADES IN ARMS

By the 1960s, with the Central Highlands being a key region in the fight against the invading communists, the RVN government agreed to let the U.S. Special Forces (SF – “Green Berets”) start training the Montagnard tribal militias in village defense and border patrolling. What the SF soldiers found in the mountains of Vietnam was a group of people unparalleled in fierce fighting skills, personal courage, and loyalty to allies. It is estimated that 40,000 Montagnards served with the U.S. military as soldiers, scouts, and interpreters, and roughly 200,000 Montagnard people perished by 1975. American Vietnam vets have given endless accounts of the Montagnards’ heroism and loyalty. One such veteran was George Clark, a former staff sergeant in 5th Special Forces Group during the Vietnam War, who also went on to serve as a master sergeant in the Marine Corps. “My team was getting lit up in the middle of a hot zone,” Clark recalled, “and I had gone down, as I had taken two bullets. And the ’Yards [short for Montagnard] on my team jumped on my body to protect me from getting wounded. They are the bravest, most loyal, and fiercest fighters I have ever seen. …”

Clark was one of a number of SF soldiers assigned to work with the Montagnard tribesmen, assigned to one of the mixed SF/Montagnard reconnaissance teams. “The first ’Yards I met in 1967, well, they kind of looked at me like I was a tourist; they literally taught me, instead of the other way around,” Clark recalled. “They knew what was dangerous in the jungle, they knew what to eat in the jungle, it was a give and take situation but first I had to earn their respect. We on the recon teams would go in ahead of the battalions … and flush out the enemy … so in essence we were the bait.”

It didn’t take Clark long to earn the loyalty of his Montagnard charges. He and his recon unit had gotten themselves into a couple of heated skirmishes on the northern RVN border, had been picked up by a Navy patrol boat, and were on their way out of the area when they ran into another enemy ambush. The crossfire panicked the young patrol boat helmsman, causing him to hit an embankment and send a highly respected Montagnard leader flying onto shore into the middle of a minefield. Without thinking Clark leapt out of the boat, determined to retrieve his teammate, and managed to make his way back to the boat, getting both himself and the Montagnard warrior back alive.

“I had to disarm numerous mines as I went,” Clark recalled, “inching my way over multiple trip wires, all while bullets were whizzing past, as by now the enemy had pretty good positioning on us, as you can imagine. When word of the rescue got out, the ’Yards just went berserk; they couldn’t believe one of us had went in and saved one of them. When the ’Yards see you do something like that. … They will follow you to hell and back. And you only get that by standing beside them and going into the fight with them. …”

Clark was one of many special operations warriors who fought alongside the formidable Montagnard people during the Vietnam War. All of them remember the Montagnards with respect and friendship, something they would turn into a personal crusade that goes on to the present day.

GENOCIDE

A dissident group that George Clark spoke to in a Cambodian refugee camp in 2005. Photo courtesy of Save the Montagnard People, Inc.

The end of the American involvement in Southeast Asia in 1975, along with the fall of the RVN to the North Vietnamese Army in April of that year, was the beginning of a dark time for the Montagnard people. Oppressed as an ethnic and religious minority in their homeland for the last 50 years, they had aligned themselves alongside the French and Americans for four decades. Then, in April 1975, during the final days of the RVN, they agreed to do something that would seal their fate. At a meeting held in the U.S. Embassy in Saigon, they were asked to fight as rear-area guerrillas against the communists in exchange for a promise of food, arms, supplies, and eventual sanctuary if needed. Given the atrocities committed by North Vietnamese forces during their march to Saigon through Montagnard territories, the tribesmen readily agreed.

For years, thousands of Montagnard fighters continued their fight against the communists, long after America and its allies had gone home and turned inward, away from the problems of a troubled world. In retaliation for fighting on, along with their strong religious beliefs, the SRV began a program of systematic repression and genocide against the Montagnards that continues to this day. Following the 1975 communist victory, the non-combatant Montagnards were forced into “restricted areas” and denied medical care and supplies. All books, Bibles, and anything written in the Montagnard language were burned. Called “cultural leveling,” the aforementioned practices are a central part of the SRV’s suppression and elimination efforts toward the Montagnards. Clark summarized the results: “In 1975, there were 7 million Montagnards. Today there are only about half-a-million left in Vietnam.”

EXODUS

Unlike the general populations of Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia, who were granted a blanket of sanctuary by the U.S. government to flee their home countries and immigrate to America after the communist victories in 1975, no such opportunity awaited the Montagnards. Lacking significant support from the U.S. State Department, and all but forgotten by the country that had promised them so much, the Montagnards languished and died for over a decade before anyone noticed. Then in 1986, 212 Montagnards were discovered in Thailand in a refugee camp. Thanks to the initiative of a number of Vietnam veterans and personal intervention by President Ronald Reagan, those 212 Montagnard refugees were resettled in North Carolina. The human story of that odyssey, however, was hardly as simple as the story told above.

Y Pioc Knul was one of the group that made it to America in 1986, and his personal story is representative of what the Montagnards have had to endure to survive.

“After the U.S. withdrew their troops from Vietnam, I joined the South Vietnam Rangers,” Knul said. “My town fell to the SRV in 1975, but not all the Montagnards turned themselves in. We regrouped in the jungle in 1976, and we tried to fight back, for three years in the jungle while we still had ammunition. Then we ran out of weapons and ammunition, were being chased … like chickens, hiding anywhere we could.”

Knul was eventually captured by the SRV in 1977, interrogated, tortured, and  sentenced to a concentration camp for three years. He was then released and kept under house arrest in his village. Not allowed to work or practice his religion, Knul decided he could not spend his life in this fashion.

“I escaped again into the jungle,” Knul said. “I met my group in the jungle and tried to hide in the jungle. But there were too many of us, almost 200. We eventually crossed Cambodia to the Thailand border and arrived at a refugee camp.”

Knul and his group were still armed when they met up with officials from the U.S. Embassy in Bangkok.

“‘There is only one way we can save you …’” Knul said the Americans told him. “‘We can bring you to the United States.’ We had [a] choice of going to either California or North Carolina where the SF people were. To us there was no choice. … We were going to where our SF brothers were. The church people there took the group they sponsored and helped find jobs for us in North Carolina. We were there for just a week or two, and already we had clothes, house, and job.”

By 1992, the remnants of the Montagnard guerilla fighters, now in Cambodia, had run out of food, ammunition, and time. A standing $400 bounty by the SRV government (called a “golden head”) had thinned their ranks to the point that only 400 or so were concentrated in five small river hamlets. However, the end of the Cold War finally began to change their fortunes. The same group of veterans who had orchestrated the 1986 relief effort swung into action, this time backed by Vice President Dan Quayle and members of the National Security Council, and soon 412 more Montagnards were on their way to North Carolina as well. Key to this and other immigration efforts from Southeast Asia was the Orderly Departure Program (ODP), created in 1979 to assist the resettlement of refugees in the United States. Though registration for the original program was closed in 1994, the United States and Vietnam reached an agreement in 2005 to allow the immigration of those people who were not allowed to do so before 1994.

Five Rhade escapees with George Clark at a safe house in Thailand in 2007. Photo courtesy of Save the Montagnard People, Inc.

Retired Special Forces soldiers and other special operations warriors have long taken the lead in attempting to keep the promises made to the Montagnards so long ago. As Clark explained, “These people are in grave danger. We’ve got to do something about this.” Thankfully, Clark and a number of his fellow Vietnam-era veterans have been doing just that through a number of Montagnard relief organizations. One of these, Save the Montagnard People, Inc., is based in North Carolina, not far from Fort Bragg.

SAVE THE MONTAGNARD PEOPLE, Inc.

Save the Montagnard People, Inc. (STMP) was originally formed in Fort Bragg, N.C., in 1997 by a handful of retired Special Forces soldiers. By 1998, Clark had caught wind of STMP and was reunited by the foundation with three Montagnards with whom he had served in Vietnam. After that first visit with his old war comrades, Clark knew that making good on old promises to a loyal ally was to become his new life mission, and today he is president of STMP. Joining Clark is Y Pioc Knul, as presiding vice chairman of the Montagnard Governing Board of STMP.

Thirty-five years after he left Southeast Asia, Clark is today fighting for his Montagnard comrades and has traded in his weapons and ammunition for a new armament of e-mails and faxes. As president of STMP, Clark is leading his charges through legislative paperwork and lobbying, helping them navigate the U.S. governmental bureaucracy and political arena in an effort to extract them from the continuing repression and genocide of the SVR government. Bottom line: If Clark and his organization can get the Montagnards onto U.S. soil, their people and culture have a fighting chance of survival.

Sam Todaro, a former SF staff sergeant who retired from the Army as a SMG, has been a director of STMP for the last four years and makes a strong case for the STMP’s mission.

“The Montagnards did not get direct [U.S.] State Department support immediately following the end of the Vietnam War as they were originally promised,” Todaro said. “The first wave of them didn’t come back to the U.S. until 1986, and then they came back as refugees through church-sponsored organizations.”

The STMP foundation’s fight is not an easy one, nor is it even close to being over.

“In the latter part of last year [2008], 56 Montagnards in a U.N.-sponsored refugee camp in Cambodia were given back to the government of Vietnam, and none of them have ever been seen again,” Clark said.

BRINGING THE MONTAGNARDS HOME TO AMERICA

Special Forces Association Chapter 57 members and former Special Forces Montagnards who work at the Special Forces Warehouse pose for a photo in 2002. Photo courtesy of Save the Montagnard People, Inc.

Since 1986, thanks to the ODP and the fierce dedication of former special operations warriors, church groups, and others, more than 5,000 Montagnards now reside in North Carolina. Each step in the process of getting the Montagnards to America from their homeland is harrowing and sometimes filled with risk. It is people like Clark, Knul, and Todaro, along with numerous other former special operators that have joined together within organizations like STMP, who lead the lobbying fight with legislators and government officials, and even go back to Southeast Asia to bring out Montagnards on their own. Clark is adamant, however, that STMP will save every Montagnard possible.

“God willing it, I am going to save the 160 ’Yards that are currently left in the U.N. Cambodian refugee camp that is about to close in April [2009],” he said. “They’ve got to be saved. I just sent a powerhouse fax to eight congressmen today … to beg, raise hell, scream … whatever it takes to save this 160 people. I don’t like it but it is what I’ve learned to do. Because that is what it takes to save lives.”

But along with the efforts of Clark and his STMP staff, there is another essential element to success in their resettlement efforts: money. Like all other nonprofit foundations, this means fundraising and finding endowment partners, something made more difficult by the present economic situation. That said, STMP is unique in that no funds from donations are ever used to pay the volunteers who staff the foundation. All of the proceeds go directly to support the Montagnards.

“No Americans will ever get paid from the STMP funds,” Todaro emphasized. “It is the love of the ’Yards that keeps me going. They were dedicated to us, are very appreciative, they are willing to work, and we owe them at least that much.”

What happens to the Montagnards when they finally reach the United States? Most settle in North Carolina near Fort Bragg. There they are living their own version of the American dream, though with a definitely Montagnard flavor, thanks to STMP and the other support groups in the area. Some examples of STMP’s support efforts include:

• Real Estate Purchase – In 2003, STMP donors raised money to purchase 100 acres of lush green farmland in North Carolina that is similar to that of the Montagnards’ ancestral highlands. By 2006, STMP members had donated $300,000 to completely pay off the entire mortgage, and proudly gave the property to the Montagnards.

• Construction – STMP has begun to add improvements to the 100-acre parcel, in the form of a replica Montagnard meeting room called a Long House, where they can teach their tribal dance and native language. STMP has also recently completed a 140-foot by 40-foot Rhrade, the same sort of home they used to live in back in Southeast Asia. These replica structures are built by the Montagnards themselves, of donated materials supplied by STMP, as close to the original specifications as is possible from their memories.

• Farming/Manufacturing – In addition to providing the Montagnards with a place to renew their cultural heritage, the land parcel also provides a means of fundraising in the form of a 20-acre farming plot. The crops raised are sold at local farmers markets, and recently a blacksmith shop has been built to allow the ’Yards to craft their own knives and other cultural artifacts.

• Scholarship Program – In 2001, a STMP member, retired Lt. Col. Carl Regan, created a college scholarship program where the only requirement is that recipients must be of Montagnard descent and attending an accredited institution. Over 1,000 Montagnard children have taken advantage of the program.

Amazingly, after all they have endured as a people, the Montagnards still feel they must serve their adoptive country, exemplified by the 127 American-born Montagnard children serving in the U.S. military.

In order to keep all these efforts going, STMP asks for your help. Their most immediate needs are financial donations, and contacting your congressional delegations to raise support for the Montagnard’s cause in Washington, D.C.

“We should be helping them because we made a commitment to them and we should follow through on our commitment,” said Clark. “We should help the people that we put in that position. You can’t say special ops without saying ’Yards!”

For more information on Save the Montagnard People, Inc., please go to their Web site, www.montagnards.org, or contact George Clark at 336-879-5014.

This article was first published in The Year in Special Operations: 2009 Edition.


By Amy P. Fabry

Amy P. Fabry is a documentary film producer based in Monterey, Calif. She has produced...

One thought on “Black Ops 2 Guerrilla Warfare Assignment Of Mortgage

Leave a comment

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *