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The Novel in the Ancient World

Series:

This is the second publication in Brill's handbook series The Classical Tradition. The subject of this volume is that group of works of extended prose narrative fiction which bears many similarities to the modern novel and which appeared in the later classical periods in Greece and Rome. The ancient novel has enjoyed renewed popularity in recent years not only among students of literature, but also among those looking for new sources on the popular culture of antiquity and among scholars of religion. The volume surveys the new insights and approaches to the ancient novel which have emerged form the application of a variety of disciplines in the recent years. The 25 senior scholars contributing to the volume are drawn from a broad range of European and North American traditions of scholarship. Chapters cover the important issues dealing with the novel, novelists, novel-like works of fiction, their development, transformation, Christianisation and Nachleben, as well as a broad range of matters, from literary/philological to cultural/historical and religious, which concerns modern scholars in the field. This publication has also been published in paperback, please click here for details.
Publication Date:
1 June 1996
ISBN:
978-90-04-21763-8

Biographical Note

Review Quote

Readership

Gareth Schmeling, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, taught at the University of Virginia, University of Colorado, and is currently Professor of Classics, University of Florida. With J.P. Sullivan he founded the Petronian Society and since 1970 he has edited the Petronian Society Newsletter. For many years he has been interested in the ancient novel and has written several books in the area - Chariton (1974), Xenophon of Ephesus (1980), A Bibliography of Petronius (1977), Historia Apollonii Regis Tyri (1988) - together with numerous articles. At present he is working on a commentary on Petronius' Satyrica.
' What makes this volume impressive is the range of issues tackled. It is certainly one of the most comprehensive and concise books on the ancient novel in recent years...This volume will not only be of great interest to Classicists but also to scholars of the modern literatures researching the 'open genre' of the novel...In conclusion one can only recommend this volume as an informative and inspiring tool which will further our understanding of and stimulate new approaches to the ancient novel and its successors.’ Karla Pollmann, Journal of Roman Studies, 1998. ' This is a good and useful collection, and one that should certainly be purchased by libraries and individuals who can afford it.' Simon Swain, Classical Review, 1998. ' This volume immediately impresses the reader…this is an important collection…It will be of use for all those who, coming from various disciplines, study aspects of the ancient novel.' C. Panayotakis and M. Zimmerman, Mnemosyne, 1999.
The volume is directed at serious students of Classics; i.e. graduate students and faculty; at those in modern languages interested in the complete history of the novel; at those fascinated by the survival of classical literature into the postmodern age; and at cultural and religious historians familiar with Greece and Rome.

  1. John L. Abbott, “Defining the Johnsonian Canon: Authority, Intuition, and the Uses of Evidence,” Modern Language Studies 18, no. 1 (Winter 1988): 89–98.
  2. John L. Abbott, “Dr. Johnson and the Society,” in The Virtuoso Tribe of Arts and Sciences: Studies in the Eighteenth-Century Work and Membership of the London Society of Arts, ed. D. G. C. Allan and John L. Abbott (Athens: Univ. of Georgia Press, 1992), pp. 7–17.
  3. J. L. Abbott and D. G. C. Allan, “‘Compassion and Horror in Every Humane Mind’: Samuel Johnson, the Society of Arts, and Eighteenth Century Prostitution,” Journal of the Royal Society of the Arts 136 (1988): 749–54, 827–32. Reprinted in The Virtuoso Tribe of Arts and Sciences: Studies in the Eighteenth-Century Work and Membership of the London Society of Arts, ed. D. G. C. Allan and John L. Abbott (Athens: Univ. of Georgia Press, 1992), pp. 18–37.
  4. Henry Abelove, “John Wesley's Plagiarism of Samuel Johnson and Its Contemporary Reception,” Huntington Library Quarterly 59, no. 1 (1997): 73–79.
  5. Rima Abunasser, “The Commerce of Knowledge in Samuel Johnson's Rasselas,” in Global Economies, Cultural Currencies of the Eighteenth Century< ed. Michael Rotenberg-Schwartz and Tara Czechowski (New York: AMS Press, 2012), pp. 215–29.
  6. Chris Ackerley, “‘Human Wishes’: Samuel Beckett and Johnson: The David Fleeman Memorial Lecture of 2005,” The Johnson Society of Australia Papers 9 (Aug. 2007): 11–28.
  7. James Eli Adams, “The Economies of Authorship: Imagination and Trade in Johnson's Dryden,” SEL 30, no. 3 (Summer 1990): 467–86.
  8. Katherine H. Adams, “A Critic Formed: Samuel Johnson's Apprenticeship with Irene 1736–1749,” in Fresh Reflections on Samuel Johnson, ed. Prem Nath (Troy: Whitston, 1987), pp. 183–200.
  9. Denise Adamucci, “The Final Decision: Lover or Friends?” M.A. Thesis, Arizona State Univ. 1993. Not seen.
  10. M. D. Aeschliman, “The Good Man Speaking Well: Samuel Johnson,” National Review 37 (11 Jan. 1985): 49–52.
  11. Saleem Ahmed, “Dr. Johnson's Rasselas: The Choice of Life,” in Essays on Dr. Samuel Johnson ed. T. R. Sharma (Meerut, India: Shalabh, 1986), pp. 43–50.
  12. Robert John Alexander, “‘Empty Sounds’: Johnson's Dictionary and the Limit of Language,” chapter 3 of “The Diversions of History: A Nonphenomenal Approach to Eighteenth-Century Linguistic Thought,” Dissertation Abstracts 59, no. 8 (Feb. 1999): 2995A. McMaster Univ. Not seen.
  13. Muhsin Jassim Ali, “Rasselas as a Colonial Discourse,” Central Institute of English & Foreign Languages Bulletin 8, no. 1 (June 1996): 47–60.
  14. Paul Alkon, “Johnson and Time Criticism,” Modern Philology 85, no. 4 (May 1988): 543–57.
  15. [Add to item 11/1:10] Paul Alkon and Robert Folkenflik, Samuel Johnson: Pictures and Words: Papers Presented at a Clark Library Seminar, 23 October 1982 (Los Angeles: Andrews Clark Memorial Library, 1985). Reviews:
    • Stephen Fix, Eighteenth-Century Studies 21 (Summer 1988): 521–26;
    • Serge Soupel, Etudes anglaises 39, no. 2 (April–June 1986): 218–19.
  16. Denna Allen, “How the TV Play of Johnson and Boswell Is Set to Spark an Outcry North of the Border,” The Mail on Sunday, 10 Oct. 1993, pp. 48–49.
  17. Julia Allen, “‘Hateful Practices’ and ‘Horrid Operations’: Johnson's Views on Vivisection,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield) (1993): 20–29.
  18. Julia Allen, Samuel Johnson's Menagerie: The Beastly Lives of Exotic Quadrupeds in the Eighteenth Century (Banham, Norwich, Norfolk: Erskine Press, 2002). Pp. x + 179. Not seen.
  19. Edward Allhusen, ed., Fopdoodle and Salmagundi: Words and Meanings from Dr Samuel Johnson's Dictionary That Time Forgot: Words and Meanings from Samuel Johnson's Dictionary That Time Forgot (Moretonhampstead, Devon: Old House Books, 2007). Pp. 208. Reviews:
    • Claire Harman, “The Words That Time Forgot,” The Telegraph, 4 Oct. 2007 (with another work).
  20. Brenda Ameter, “Samuel Johnson's View of America: A Moral Judgment, Based on Conscience, Not Compromise,” in Approaches to Teaching the Works of Samuel Johnson, ed. David R. Anderson and Gwin J. Kolb (New York: MLA, 1993), pp. 71–77.
  21. David Amigoni, “‘Borrowing Gargantua's Mouth’: Biography, Bakhtin and Grotesque Discourse — James Boswell, Thomas Carlyle and Leslie Stephen on Samuel Johnson,” in Victorian Culture and the Idea of the Grotesque, ed. Colin Trodd, Paul Barlow, and David Amigoni (Aldershot: Ashgate, 1999), pp. 21–36.
  22. Sadrul Amir, “Some Aspects of Johnson as a Critic,” Dhaka University Studies Part A 42, no. 1 (1985): 40–58.
  23. Hugh Amory, Dreams of a Poet Doomed at Last to Wake a Lexicographer (Cambridge, Mass.: Houghton Library, 1986). Pp. 8. 250 copies printed for the Johnsonians.
  24. David R. Anderson, “Johnson and the Problem of Religious Verse,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 4 (1991): 41–57.
  25. David R. Anderson, “Classroom Texts: The Teacher, the Anthology,” in Approaches to Teaching the Works of Samuel Johnson, ed. David R. Anderson and Gwin J. Kolb (New York: MLA, 1993), pp. 3–7.
  26. David R. Anderson and Gwin J. Kolb, eds., Approaches to Teaching the Works of Samuel Johnson (New York: MLA, 1993). Pp. x + 152. Reviews:
    • O M Brack, Jr., Rocky Mountain Review of Language and Literature 49 (1995): 169–74 (with other works);
    • A. F. T. Lurcock, N&Q 42, no. 3 (Sept. 1995): 402–3.
  27. Eric Anderson, “Robert Anderson: Johnson's Other Scottish Biographer,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield) (1992): 1–7.
  28. Christopher Andreae, “Exaggerate, Said Dr. Johnson,” The Christian Science Monitor, 31 Oct. 1985, p. 34.
  29. Edward G. Andrew, “Samuel Johnson and the Question of Enlightenment in England,” chapter 8 (pp. 154–69) of Patrons of Enlightenment (Toronto: Univ. of Toronto Press, 2006).
  30. [Anon.], A Short-Title Catalog of Eighteenth Century Editions of Dr. Samuel Johnson's “Dictionary” in Special Collections, the Library of the School of Library and Information Science, the University of Western Ontario (London, Ont.: Univ. of Western Ontario, 1985).
  31. [Anon.], “Boswell Find,” The Times, 6 June 1985, p. 5h. Two newly discovered letters — one by Johnson, one by Boswell — in Canberra National Library.
  32. [Anon.], “Dr. Johnson by Mrs. Thrale: The ‘Anecdotes’ of Mrs. Piozzi in Their Original Form,” The New Yorker 61 (30 Dec. 1985): 80.
  33. [Anon.], “Boswell on Johnson on Conversation,” The Christian Science Monitor, 3 June 1986, p. 42.
  34. [Anon.], “Dr. Johnson's Dog,” The Economist, 26 Dec. 1987, p. 7.
  35. [Anon.], “Samuel Johnson's Tics,” FDA Consumer 22 (Sept. 1988): 29.
  36. [Anon.], Samuel Johnson, Writer, 1709–1784 (Falls Church, Va.: Landmark Films, 1988). Videocassette.
  37. [Anon.], Samuel Johnson, Author for All Seasons: An Exhibition of Manuscripts & Books from the Library of Loren & Frances Rothschild Held at the Doheny Memorial Library, University of Southern California (Pacific Palisades and Los Angeles: Rasselas Press & the USC Fine Arts Press, 1988). Pp. 33.
  38. [Anon.], “Guests Outside Dr Samuel Johnson's House at 17 Gough Square, off Fleet Street, for its Reopening,” The Independent, 24 May 1990, p. 6.
  39. [Anon.], “Down into Egypt,” Philosophy 65, no. 254 (Oct. 1990): 395–97. Editorial.
  40. [Anon.], “Dr Johnson Relic May Be Replaced,” The Independent, 11 March 1991, p. 2.
  41. [Anon.], “‘The Mantle of Johnson Descends on Gisbourne’: Samuel Johnson and Some Controversies of the 1820's,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield) (1991): 29–33.
  42. [Anon.], “The Gobblies at the Gate,” The Economist 325, no. 7786 (21 Nov. 1992): 104.
  43. [Anon.], “John Wilkes, Esq., and Dr. Samuel Johnson,” The Atlantic 271, no. 3 (March 1993): 87.
  44. [Anon.], “Boxing: Dr Johnson's Plea Rings Out over Another Lull in Boxing,” The Sunday Telegraph, 10 Oct. 1993, p. 5.
  45. [Anon.], “On the Road with Johnson & Boswell & Co.,” Telegraph MagazineThe Daily Telegraph, 11 Sept. 1993, p. 36.
  46. [Anon.], “Samuel Johnson, Man of the Theater,” New York 28, no. 19 (8 May 1995): 83.
  47. [Anon.], “Dr. Johnson's Regard for Truth,” The Herald (Glasgow), 17 Feb. 1996, p. 14.
  48. [Anon.], “Dr. Johnson's Zeal for Gaelic,” The Herald (Glasgow), 26 Feb. 1996, p. 12.
  49. [Anon.], “Johnson's Bestiary,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield) (1997): 24–29. Humorous piece on Dictionary definitions on animals.
  50. [Anon.], “An Original ‘Fame’ School,” Leicester Mercury, 16 June 1998, p. 4. Brief profile of the Dixie Grammar School in Market Bosworth.
  51. [Anon.], Johnson, Boswell, and Their Circle: Books and Manuscripts, Including New Acquisitions from a Private Collection (London: Bernard Quaritch, 1999). Pp. 88. A sale catalogue.
  52. [Anon.], “Johnson beyond Boswell,” Wilson Quarterly 23, no. 3 (Summer 1999): 119–20. A review of Stephen Miller's “Why Read Samuel Johnson?”
  53. [Anon.], “Dryden, Chesterfield, and Johnson's ‘Celebrated Letter’: A Case of Compound Allusion,” Notes & Queries 48, no. 4 (2001): 413.
  54. [Anon.], “Tour the Western Isles: Two Erudite Friends Set Off to See the Once Remote Hebrides,” British Heritage 22, no. 3 (April–May 2001): 52–58. Not seen.
  55. [Anon.], “Regulating Language,” The Hindu, 3 Oct. 2004, pp. 47–48.
  56. Kelly Anspaugh, “Traveling to the Lighthouse with Woolf and Johnson,” Virginia Woolf Miscellany 45 (Spring 1995): 4–5.
  57. Jonathan Arac, “The Media of Sublimity: Johnson and Lamb on King Lear,” Studies in Romanticism 26, no. 2 (Summer 1987): 209–20.
  58. Jonathan Arac, “Truth,” PMLA 115, no. 5 (Oct. 2000): 1085–88.
  59. Helen Ashmore, introd., Frances Reynolds and Samuel Johnson: A Keepsake to Mark the 286th Birthday of Samuel Johnson and the 49th Annual Dinner of the Johnsonians (Cambridge: Houghton Library, 1995). Pp. 28. At Harvard University, 15 Sept. 1995.
  60. Helen Ashmore, “‘Do Not, My Love, Burn Your Papers’: Samuel Johnson and Frances Reynolds: A New Document,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 10 (1999): 165–94.
  61. James Atlas, “Dr. Johnson's Open House,” House & Garden 159 (Dec. 1987): 12.
  62. James Atlas, “Holmes on the Case,” The New Yorker 70, no. 29 (19 Sept. 1994): 57–65. On Holmes's Dr. Johnson and Mr. Savage.
  63. James Atlas, “Over the Sea to Skye,” Condé Nast Traveler 31 (June 1996): 120–29.
  64. Tim Aurthur and Steven Calt, “Opium and Samuel Johnson,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 17 (2006): 85–99.
  65. I. Avin, “Driven to Distinguish: Samuel Johnson's Lexicographic Turn of Mind: A Psychocritical Study,” doctoral dissertation, Univ. of St. Andrews, 1997. Not seen.
  66. Amittai F. Aviram, “Poetic Envoi: Epistle of Mrs. Frances Burney to Dr. Samuel Johnson Regarding the Most Unfortunate Mr. Christopher Smart,” in Christopher Smart and the Enlightenment, ed. Clement Hawes (New York: St. Martin's, 1999), pp. 283–87.
  67. Amad Awwad, “Samuel Johnson and the Issue of Holy Matrimony,” M.A. Thesis, California State University, Hayward, 1986. Not seen.
  68. Bernard Bailyn, “Does a Freeborn Englishman Have a Right to Emigrate?” American Heritage 37 (1986): 24–31.
  69. Beryl Bainbridge, According to Queeney (London: Little, Brown; New York: Carroll & Graf, 2001). Pp. 224. Novel told from Queeney Thrale's point of view. Reviews:
    • Melissa Bennetts, “Samuel Johnson Knew the Definition of ‘Peccadillo,’” Christian Science Monitor, 19 July 2001, p. 19;
    • Richard Bernstein, “Putting Words in Dr. Johnson's Mouth, Words He'd Like,” The New York Times, 8 Aug. 2001, p. E10;
    • Mark Bostridge, “Pride and Patronage,” The Independent on Sunday, 2 Sept. 2001, p. 15;
    • Kate Chisolm, “The Friendship That Couldn't Last,” The Sunday Telegraph, 26 Aug. 2001, p. 13;
    • Barbara Fisher, The Boston Globe, 26 Aug. 2001, p. D3 (with another work);
    • Loraine Fletcher, “A Sharper Definition of Samuel Johnson,” The Independent, 1 Sept. 2001, p. 9;
    • Gloria Sibyl Gross, The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 14 (2003): 415–16;
    • Anne Haverty, “The Tragic Story of Unspoken Passion,” The Irish Times, 18 Aug. 2001, p. 67;
    • Henry Hitchings, TLS, 7 September 2001, pp. 3–4;
    • Freya Johnston, The New Rambler E:4 (2000–1): 88–91;
    • Peter Kemp, “In Thrall to Mrs Thrale,” The Sunday Times, 2 Sept. 2001;
    • Kirkus Reviews, 15 June 2001;
    • Gary Krist, “A Doctor in the House,” The Washington Post, 19 Aug. 2001, p. T7;
    • Thomas Mallon, “Dr. Johnson's Maecenas,” New York Times Book Review, 12 Aug. 2001;
    • John E. McIntyre, “Bainbridge's Lyric Samuel Johnson,” The Baltimore Sun, 12 Aug. 2001, p. 12F;
    • Andrew Marr, “Johnson: The Novel,” The Daily Telegraph, 25 Aug. 2001, p. 5;
    • Allan Massie, “Dame Beryl's Tour de Force,” The Scotsman, 1 Sept. 2001, p. 7;
    • Roger K. Miller, “Boswell Gets His Due as Biographer of Samuel Johnson,” Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, 26 Aug. 2001, p. G8;
    • John Mullan, The Guardian, 1 Sept. 2001, p. 9;
    • Robert Nye, “Key to the Doctor's Padlock,” The Times, 22 Aug. 2001;
    • Robert Allen Papinchak, “18th Century Brought to Life in ‘Queeney,’” Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 22 July 2001, p. 6E;
    • Publisher's Weekly, 23 July 2001;
    • Merle Rubin, “Envisioning the Smaller World of the Great Dr. Johnson,” The Los Angeles Times, 13 Aug. 2001, part 5, p. 3;
    • Susanna Rustin, “The Doctor is Debunked,” The Financial Times, 22 Sept. 2001, Books, p. 4;
    • Adam Sisman, “Madness and the Mistress,” The Observer, 26 Aug. 2001, p. 15;
    • Paul Tankard, “Novel Treatment of Johnson,” The Southern Johnsonian 9, no. 2 (Aug. 2002): 6–7;
    • Joel Yanofsky, The Gazette (Montreal), 1 Sept. 2001, p. J1.
  70. Beryl Bainbridge, “Remembering Sam,” The New Rambler, E:4 (2000–1): 24–26.
  71. Beryl Bainbridge, “Words Count: Samuel Johnson's Dictionary Was Published 250 Years Ago This Month,” The Guardian, 2 April 2005, p. 5.
  72. Paul Baines, “‘Putting a Book out of Place’: Johnson, Ossian and the Highland Tour,” Durham University Journal 53, no. 2 (July 1992): 235–48.
  73. Paul Baines, “Chatterton and Johnson: Authority and Filitation in the 1770s,” in Thomas Chatterton and Romantic Culture, ed. Nick Groom (New York: St. Martin's, 1999), pp. 172–87.
  74. Paul Baines, The House of Forgery in Eighteenth-Century Britain (Aldershot: Ashgate, 1999), chapter 5 (“Johnson, Ossian, and the Highland Tour”), pp. 103–24); chapter 6 (“The Many Lives of Doctor Dodd”), pp. 125–50.
  75. John D. Baird, “‘A Louse and a Flea’: A Source for Johnson's Rejoinder,” N&Q 37, no. 3 (Sept. 1990): 312.
  76. Russell Baker, “Typical American Noises,” New York Times, 146 (29 March 1997): 19(L).
  77. Barry Baldwin, “Samuel Johnson and the Classics,” Hellas: A Journal of Poetry and the Humanities 2, no. 2 (Fall 1991): 227–38.
  78. Barry Baldwin, “Samuel Johnson and Vergil,” Prudentia, 24 (1992): 37–63.
  79. Barry Baldwin, “Johnson's Conglobulating Swallows,” N&Q 41, no. 2 (June 1994): 199–206.
  80. Barry Baldwin, “The Mysterious Letter ‘M’ in Johnson's Diaries,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 6 (1994): 131–46.
  81. Barry Baldwin, “A Classical Source for Johnson on Augustus and Lord Bute,” N&Q 42, no. 4 (Dec. 1995): 467–68.
  82. Barry Baldwin, “Samuel Johnson and Petronius,” Petronian Society Newsletter 25 (1995): 14–15.
  83. Barry Baldwin, “Plautus in Johnson: An Unnoticed Quotation,” N&Q 43 (Sept. 1996): 305–6.
  84. Barry Baldwin, “Samuel Johnson and Lincolnshire,” The New Rambler E:3 (1999–2000): 46–48.
  85. Barry Baldwin, “Johnson & the Pembroke Latin Grace,” Johnsonian News Letter 55, no. 1 (March 2004): 47–48.
  86. Barry Baldwin, “Johnson on Smoking,” Johnsonian News Letter 57, no. 1 (March 2006): 42–44.
  87. Barry Baldwin, “Classic-al Comments,” Johnsonian News Letter 57, no. 1 (March 2006): 45–46.
  88. Barry Baldwin, “Classica Johnsoniana,” Johnsonian News Letter 58, no. 1 (March 2007): 35–40.
  89. Barry Baldwin, “Johnson on Philips via Cicero on Lucretius,” Johnsonian News Letter 59, no. 1 (March 2008): 42–43.
  90. Barry Baldwin, “Johnson and ‘The Jests of Hierocles,’” Johnsonian News Letter 60, no. 1 (March 2009): 40–43.
  91. Barry Baldwin “Mrs. Thrale and the Classics,” Johnsonian News Letter 60, no. 2 (Sept. 2009): 44–48.
  92. Laura Bandiera, “Samuel Johnson: The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abyssinia, chapter 3 of Settecento e malinconia: saggi di letteratura inglese (Bologna: Patron Editore, 1995), pp. 101–23. In Italian.
  93. A. Banerjee, “Dr. Johnson's Daughter: Jane Austen and Northanger Abbey,” English Studies 71 (April 1990): 113–24.
  94. A. Banerjee, “Johnson's Patron,” TLS ??? (1 June 2007): 17.
  95. J. Hunter Barbour, “Wit, Mirth & Spleen: ‘I Am Willing to Love All Mankind, Except an American,’” Colonial Williamsburg: The Journal of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation 22, no. 4 (Winter 2000–1): 84–85.
  96. Michel Baridon, “On the Relation of Ideology to Form in Johnson's Style,” in Fresh Reflections on Samuel Johnson, ed. Prem Nath (Troy: Whitston, 1987), pp. 85–105.
  97. Brooke Ann Barker, “The Representation of Prostitutes in Eighteenth-Century British Literature,” Dissertation Abstracts International 53 (1993): 2377A.
  98. Geoff Barnbrook, “Johnson the Prescriptivist? The Case for the Prosecution,” in Anniversary Essays on Johnson's “Dictionary,” ed. Jack Lynch and Anne McDermott (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2005), pp. 91–112.
  99. Geoff Barnbrook, “Usage Notes in Johnson's Dictionary,” International Journal of Lexicography 18, no. 2 (June 2005): 189–201.
  100. Carol Barnett, Elegy: An Epitaph on Claudy Phillips, a Musician (1988). Music by Carol Barnett, with words by Samuel Johnson. Holograph score at New York Public Library.
  101. Louise K. Barnett, “Dr. Johnson's Mother: Maternal Ideology and the Life of Savage,” Studies on Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century 304 (1992): 856–59.
  102. Jeffrey Barnouw, “Learning from Experience, or Not: From Chrysippus to Rasselas,” Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture 33 (2004): 313–38.
  103. Elizabeth Barry, “The Long View: Beckett, Johnson, Wordsworth and the Language of Epitaphs,” Samuel Beckett Today/Aujourd'hui: An Annual Bilingual Review/Revue Annuelle Bilingue 18 (2007): 47–60.
  104. Joseph F. Bartolomeo, “Johnson, Richardson, and the Audience for Fiction,” N&Q 33, no. 4 (Dec. 1986): 517.
  105. Joseph F. Bartolomeo, A New Species of Criticism: Eighteenth-Century Discourse on the Novel (Newark: Univ. of Delaware Press, 1994), chapter 2 (“Cracking Facades of Authority: Richardson, Fielding, and Johnson”), pp. 47–87.
  106. Philip Edward Baruth, “Recognizing the Author-Function: Alternatives to Greene's Black-And-Red Book of Johnson Logia,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 5 (1992): 35–59.
  107. Philip Edward Baruth, “Positioning the (Auto)Biographical Self: Ideological Fictions of Self in Boswell, Johnson, and John Bunyan,” Dissertation Abstracts International 54, no. 3 (Sept. 1993): 936A. Univ. of California, Irvine.
  108. Philip Baruth, The Brothers Boswell (New York: Soho Press, 2009). Pp. 336. Reviews:
    • Patrick Anderson, “Scary Olde England,” Washington Post, 4 May 2009;
    • Publishers Weekly, 30 March 2009.
  109. James G. Basker, “Dancing Dogs, Women Preachers and the Myth of Johnson's Misogyny,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 3 (1990): 63–90.
  110. James G. Basker, “Scotticisms and the Problem of Cultural Identity in Eighteenth-Century Britain,” Eighteenth-Century Life 15, nos. 1–2 (Feb.–May 1991): 81–95; reprinted in Sociability and Society in Eighteenth-Century Scotland (Edinburgh: Mercat Press, 1993).
  111. James G. Basker, “Resisting Authority; Or, Johnson and the Wizard of Oz,” in Approaches to Teaching the Works of Samuel Johnson, ed. David R. Anderson and Gwin J. Kolb (New York: MLA, 1993), pp. 28–34.
  112. James G. Basker, “Samuel Johnson and the American Common Reader,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 6 (1994): 3–30.
  113. James Basker, “Samuel Johnson and the African-American Reader,” The New Rambler D:10 (1994–95), 47–57.
  114. James G. Basker, “Coming of Age in Johnson's England: Adolescence in the Rambler,” in Les Ages de la vie en Grande-Bretagne au XVIIIe siècle, ed. Serge Soupel (Paris: Sorbonne Nouvelle, 1995), pp. 197–212.
  115. James G. Basker, “Dictionary Johnson amidst the Dons of Sidney: A Chapter in Eighteenth-Century Cambridge History,” in Sidney Sussex College Cambridge: Historical Essays in Commemoration of the Quatercentenary, ed. D. E. D. Beales and H. B. Nisbet (Boydell Press, 1996), pp. 131–44.
  116. James G. Basker, “Radical Affinities: Mary Wollstonecraft and Samuel Johnson,” in Tradition in Transition: Women Writers, Marginal Texts, and the Eighteenth-Century Canon, ed. Alvaro Ribeiro and James G. Basker (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1996), pp. 41–55.
  117. James G. Basker, “An Eighteenth-Century Critique of Eurocentrism: Samuel Johnson and the Plight of Native Americans,” in La Grande-Bretagne et l'Europe des Lumières, ed. Serge Soupel (Paris: Presses de la Sorbonne Nouvelle, 1996), pp. 207–20.
  118. James G. Basker, “Samuel Johnson,” in Britain in the Hanoverian Age 1714–1837, ed. Gerald Newman et al. (New York: Garland, 1997), pp. 378–80.
  119. James G. Basker, “Myth upon Myth: Johnson, Gender, and the Misogyny Question,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 8 (1997): 175–87.
  120. James G. Basker, Samuel Johnson in the Mind of Thomas Jefferson: With Thomas Jefferson's Letter to Herbert Croft, 30 October 1798 (New York: privately printed for the Johnsonians, 1999). Pp. 16.
  121. James G. Basker, “‘The Next Insurrection’: Johnson, Race, and Rebellion,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 11 (2000): 37–51.
  122. James G. Basker, “Intimations of Abolitionism in 1759: Johnson, Hawkesworth, and Oroonoko,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 12 (2001): 47–66.
  123. James G. Basker, “Multicultural Perspectives: Johnson, Race, and Gender,” in Johnson Re-Visioned: Looking Before and After, ed. Philip Smallwood (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 2001), pp. 64–79.
  124. James G. Basker, “Johnson, Boswell and the Abolition of Slavery,” The New Rambler E:5 (2001–2): 36–48.
  125. Lionel Basney, “‘His Proper Business’: Johnson's Adjustment to Society,” Texas Studies in Literature and Language 32, no. 3 (Fall 1990): 397–416.
  126. Lionel Basney, “Prudence in the Life of Savage,” ELN 28, no. 2 (Dec. 1990): 17–24.
  127. Lionel Basney, “Narrative and Judgment in the Life of Savage,” Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly 14, no. 2 (Spring 1991): 153–64.
  128. Jonathan Bate, “Johnson and Shakespeare,” The New Rambler C:25 (1985–86), 11–13.
  129. Jonathan Bate, “Johnson, Garrick and Macbeth,” The New Rambler D:9 (1993–94), 8–12.
  130. Walter Jackson Bate, A Life of Allegory (Savannah, Armstrong State College, 1995). Videocassettes of the Conrad Aiken Video Lectures Series. Separate parts: “Samuel Johnson's Four Great Themes,” “Samuel Johnson: The Dark Years”; “Johnson, Psychology & English Prose Style”; “Samuel Johnson: The Final Years”; “Boswell.” Not seen.
  131. Walter Jackson Bate, Samuel Johnson, 2nd ed. (Washington, D.C.: Counterpoint, 1998). Pp. xxii + 646. Reviews:
    • Bernice Grohskopf, The Virginian-Pilot, 13 Sept. 1998, p. J2;
    • John Mullan, Biography 22, no. 3 (Summer 1999): 442 (with another work).
  132. James L. Battersby, “Life, Art, and the Lives of the Poets,” in Domestick Privacies: Samuel Johnson and the Art of Biography, ed. David Wheeler (Lexington: Univ. Press of Kentucky, 1987), pp. 26–56.
  133. James L. Battersby, “The ‘Lame and Impotent’ Conclusion to The Vanity of Human Wishes Reconsidered,” in Fresh Reflections on Samuel Johnson, ed. Prem Nath (Troy: Whitston, 1987), pp. 227–55.
  134. James Battersby, “Samuel Johnson and Jane Austen,” Johnsonian News Letter 55, no. 1 (March 2004): 46–47.
  135. James Battersby, “A Prologue after, not by, Samuel Johnson,” Johnsonian News Letter 55, no. 2 (Sept. 2004): 55–58. On an obscene parody of the “Drury Lane Prologue” in a Victorian magazine.
  136. James Battersby, “A Proverbial Candle and Johnson's Candlestick,” Johnsonian News Letter 57, no. 2 (Sept. 2006): 29–39.
  137. Martin C. Battestin, “Dr. Johnson and the Case of Harry Fielding,” in Eighteenth-Century Genre and Culture: Serious Reflections on Occasional Forms: Essays in Honor of J. Paul Hunter, ed. Dennis Todd (Newark: Univ. of Delaware Press, 2001), pp. 96–113.
  138. Martin C. Battestin, “The Critique of Freethinking from Swift to Sterne,” Eighteenth-Century Fiction 15, nos. 3–4 (April–July 2003): 341–420.
  139. Randy C. Bax, “Linguistic Accommodation: The Correspondence between Samuel Johnson and Hester Lynch Thrale,” Amsterdam Studies in the Theory and History of Linguistic Science Series 4, no. 224 (2002): 9–24. Not seen.
  140. Adam R. Beach, “The Creation of a Classical Language in the Eighteenth Century: Standardizing English, Cultural Imperialism, and the Future of the Literary Canon,” Texas Studies in Literature and Language 43, no. 2 (2001): 117–41.
  141. Lucy Beckett, In the Light of Christ: Writings in the Western Tradition (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 2006).
  142. John Beer, “Coleridge, Wordsworth and Johnson,” Journal of the English Language and Literature (Seoul), 33 (1987): 25–42.
  143. Michele A. Beilman, “Anthropological Particulars: Johnson's Ambivalent Pastoral Dream,” Wascana Review of Contemporary Poetry and Short Fiction 27, no. 1 (Spring 1992): 73–89.
  144. Wendy Laura Belcher, Abyssinia's Samuel Johnson: Ethiopian Thought in the Making of an English Author (New York: Oxford Univ. Press, 2012). Pp. x + 285.
  145. Liz Bellamy, Samuel Johnson (Horndon: Northcote, 2005). Pp. xi + 100. Not seen.
  146. Rachel Elizabeth Bennett, “Economies of Ending: Goldsmith, Johnson, and the Purpose of Poetry,” chapter 2 of “The Secret Horrour of the Last: Readers, Authors, and the Production of Ends in the Long Eighteenth Century,” Dissertation Abstracts International 62, no. 5 (Nov. 2001): 1842A. Univ. of Alberta. Not seen.
  147. V. I. Berezkina, “Iz istorii zhanra esse v angliiskoi literature XVIII v.: K probleme istoricheskoi poetiki zhanra,” Filologicheskie Nauki 4 (1991), pp. 49–61. In Russian.
  148. Lisa Berglund, “Learning to Read The Rambler,” Dissertation Abstracts International 56, no. 4 (Oct. 1995): 1363A. University of Virginia.
  149. Lisa Berglund, “Writing to Mr. Rambler: Samuel Johnson and Exemplary Autobiography,” Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture 29 (1999): 241–59.
  150. Lisa Berglund, “Allegory in The Rambler,” Papers on Language and Literature 37, no. 2 (Spring 2001): 147–78.
  151. Lisa Berglund, “‘Look, My Lord, It Comes’: The Approach of Death in the Life of Johnson,” 1650–1850: Ideas, Æsthetics, and Inquiries in the Early Modern Era 7 (2002): 239–55.
  152. Lisa Berglund, “What Is Samuel Johnson's Role in Contemporary Fiction?,” Johnsonian News Letter 55, no. 2 (Sept. 2004): 27–31.
  153. Lisa Berglund, “A Lexicon! A Lexicon!” Johnsonian News Letter 59, no. 1 (March 2008): 11–13.
  154. Lisa Berglund, “‘I Am Lost without My Boswell’: Samuel Johnson and Sherlock Holmes,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 22 (2012): 131–43.
  155. Gina Berkeley, “Verses after Dr. Johnson,” The New Rambler D:10 (1994–95), 64.
  156. Kevin J. Berland, “‘The Air of a Porter’: Lichtenberg and Lavater Test Physiognomy by Looking at Johnson,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 10 (1999): 219–30.
  157. Kevin Berland, “The Paradise Garden and the Imaginary East: Alterity and Reflexivity in British Oriental Romances,” Eighteenth Century Novel 2 (2002): 137–59.
  158. Carol Ray Berninger, “Across Celtic Borders: Johnson, Boswell, Piozzi, Scott,” Dissertation Abstracts International 54 (1994): 4099A. Drew University. Not seen.
  159. A. M. Berrett, “Francis Barber's Marriage and Children: A Correction,” N&Q 35 (June 1988): 193.
  160. David Bevington, “The Siren Call of Earlier Editorial Practice; or, How Dr. Johnson Failed to Respond Fully to His Own Intuitions about the Principles of Textual Criticism and Editing,” in Comparative Excellence: New Essays on Shakespeare and Johnson, ed. Eric Rasmussen and Aaron Santesso (New York: AMS Press, 2007), pp. 139–60.
  161. James Biester, “Samuel Johnson on Letters,” Rhetorica 6, no. 2 (Spring 1988): 145–66.
  162. Andrew Billen, Who Was . . . Sam Johnson: The Wonderful Word Doctor (London: Short Books, 2004). Pp. 93. Biography for children. Reviews:
    • Matthew Davis, Johnsonian News Letter 59, no. 1 (March 2008): 54–55;
    • Lindsay Fraser, The Guardian, 25 May 2004;
    • Nicolette Jones, The Sunday Times, 23 May 2004.
  163. Mirella Billi, “Johnson's Beauties. The Lexicon of the Aesthetics in the Dictionary,” Textus: English Studies in Italy 19, no. 1 (Jan.–June 2006): 131–50. Not seen.
  164. Anne Bindslev, “‘Introducing Herself into the Chair of Criticism’: Dr. Johnson, Monsieur Voltaire and Mrs. Montagu,” in Proceedings from the Third Nording Conference for English Studies, Hässelby, 25–27 September 1986, ed. Ishrad Lindblad and Magnus Ljung, 2 vols. (Stockholm: Almqvist & Wiskell, 1987), pp. 519–31.
  165. Jeremy Black, “Samuel Johnson, Thoughts on the Late Transactions Respecting Falkland's Islands and the Tory Tradition in Foreign Policy,” in Samuel Johnson in Historical Context, ed. J. C. D. Clark and Howard Erskine-Hill (Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2002), pp. 169–83.
  166. Harold Bloom, ed., Modern Critical Interpretations: James Boswell's Life of Samuel Johnson (New York: Chelsea House, 1986). Pp. viii + 160. A collection of previously published essays.
  167. Harold Bloom, ed. Modern Critical Views: Dr. Samuel Johnson and James Boswell (New York: Chelsea House, 1986). A collection of previously published essays. Pp. viii + 280. Reviews:
    • Steven Lynn, South Atlantic Review 55, no. 2 (May 1990): 143–46.
  168. Harold Bloom, The Western Canon: The Books and School of the Ages (New York: Harcourt Brace, 1994), pp. 183–202.
  169. Harold Bloom, Genius: A Mosaic of One Hundred Exemplary Creative Minds (New York: Warner Books, 2002), lustre 4 (“Samuel Johnson, James Boswell, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Sigmund Freud, Thomas Mann”), pp. 166–87.
  170. Harold Bloom, “Samuel Johnson and Goethe,” chapter 5 (pp. 156–89) of Where Shall Wisdom Be Found? (New York: Riverhead Books, 2004).
  171. Ronald Blythe, ed., The Pleasures of Diaries: Four Centuries of Private Writing (New York: Pantheon Books, 1989). Pp xi + 388. Includes selections from and discussions of Johnson's diaries.
  172. Fredric Bogel, “Johnson and the Role of Authority,” in The New Eighteenth Century: Theory, Politics, English Literature, ed. Felicity Nussbaum and Laura Brown (New York: Methuen, 1987), pp. 189–209. Reviews:
    • Howard Weinbrot, “The New Eighteenth Century and the New Mythology,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 3 (1990): 353–407.
  173. Fredric V. Bogel, The Dream of My Brother: An Essay on Johnson's Authority (Victoria, B.C.: Univ. of Victoria, 1990). Pp. 94. Reviews:
    • Stuart Sherman, Johnsonian News Letter 50, no. 3–51, no. 3 (Sept. 1990–Sept. 1991): 8–9.
  174. Gary Boire, “‘Wide-wasting Pest’: Social History in The Vanity of Human Wishes,” Eighteenth-Century Life, 12, no. 2 (May 1988): 73–85.
  175. Erik Bond, “Bringing Up Boswell: Drama, Criticism, and the Journals,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 15 (2004): 151–76.
  176. Thomas F. Bonnell, “John Bell's Poets of Great Britain: The ‘Little Trifling Edition’ Revisited,” Modern Philology 85, no. 2 (Nov. 1987): 128–52.
  177. Thomas F. Bonnell, “Bookselling and Canon-Making: The Trade Rivalry over the English Poets, 1776–1783,” Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture 19 (1989): 53–69.
  178. Thomas F. Bonnell, “The Jenyns Review: ‘Leibnitian Reasoning’ on Trial,” in Approaches to Teaching the Works of Samuel Johnson, ed. David R. Anderson and Gwin J. Kolb (New York: MLA, 1993), pp. 92–98.
  179. Thomas F. Bonnell, “Patchwork and Piracy: John Bell's ‘Connected System of Biography’ and the Use of Johnson's Prefaces,” Studies in Bibliography 48 (1995): 193–228.
  180. William Brian Booth, “Samuel Johnson and Work,” Dissertation Abstracts International 51, no. 11 (May 1991): 3750A. Not seen.
  181. David Borkowski, “(Class)ifying Language: The War of the Word,” Rhetoric Review 21, no. 4 (Oct. 2002): 357–83.
  182. [James Boswell], Boswell's London Journal (Princeton: Films for the Humanities, 1987). One videocassette. Not seen.
  183. James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson (Ashland, Oregon: Classics on Tape, 1988–90). Read by Jim Killavey. Recording on 24 audio cassettes. Not seen.
  184. James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1990). Pp. xvii + 618.
  185. James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson, ed. and abr. by John Canning (London: Methuen, 1991). Pp. xviii + 366.
  186. James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson (London: David Campbell, 1992). Pp. xlix + 613.
  187. James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson, translated (into Hebrew) by Tova Rozen (Jerusalem: Carmel, 1992).
  188. James Boswell, Samuel Johnson's Life and the Most Meaningful Events of His Times (Gloucester: Gloucester Art, 1993).
  189. James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson with an introduction by Claude Rawson (New York: Everyman's Library, 1993).
  190. James Boswell, James Boswell's Life of Johnson: An Edition of the Original Manuscript in Four Volumes vol. 1, ed. Marshall Waingrow (New Haven: Yale Univ. Press, 1994); vol. 2, ed. Bruce Redford (New Haven: Yale Univ. Press, 1999). Pp. xxxix + 518; xviii + 303. Reviews:
    • John L. Abbott, Eighteenth-Century Scotland 10 (1996): 14;
    • Linda Colley, London Review of Books 17, no. 18 (1995): 14–15 (with another work);
    • Patricia B. Craddock, The Eighteenth Century: A Current Bibliography 20–21 (2001 for 1994–95), 486;
    • Henry Hitchings, TLS, 26 Nov. 1999, p. 33;
    • Alan Ingram, Yearbook of English Studies 28 (1998): 319–20;
    • Andrew O'Hagan, London Review of Books 22, no. 19 (5 Oct. 2000): 7–8;
    • Allen Reddick, The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual, 8 (1997): 405–14;
    • Michael F. Suarez, S.J., TLS, 15 Dec. 1995, pp. 11–12;
    • David Womersley, Review of English Studies 48 (1997): 114–16.
  191. James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson [abridgment] (London: Naxos AudioBooks, Ltd., 1994). Two audio CDs read by Billy Hartman. Not seen.
  192. James Boswell, From the Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D [abridgment] (Edinburgh: Akros, 1995). Pp. 16. Limited edition of 130 numbered copies.
  193. James Boswell, La vida del doctor Samuel Johnson, tr. and abr. by Antonio Dorta, with a preface by Fernando Savater, 2nd ed. (Madrid: Espasa Calpe, 1998). Pp. 265.
  194. James Boswell, Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides with Samuel Johnson, LL.D., ed. Iain Galbraith (Köln: Konemann, 2000). Pp. 418.
  195. James Boswell, The Correspondence and Other Papers of James Boswell Relating to the Making of the “Life of Johnson,” ed. Marshall Waingrow, corrected and enlarged edition [of item 4/21]. Reviews:
    • James Campbell, TLS, 14 Sept. 2001, pp. 30–31;
    • James McLaverty, The New Rambler E:5 (2001–2): 67–69 (with another work);
    • Paul Tankard, The Southern Johnsonian, 10, no. 3 (Oct. 2003): 6–7.
  196. James Boswell, The Essential Boswell: Selections from the Writings of James Boswell, ed. Peter Martin (London: Weidenfeld & Nicholson, 2003). Pp. 416. Reviews:
    • Andrew Riemer, “Posthumous Cheek of a Man of Letters,” Sydney Morning Herald, 27 March 2004, Books Section, p. 13.
  197. James Boswell, Zhizn Semiuelia Dzhonsona: Otryvki iz knigi, s prilozheniem izbrannykh proizvedenii Semiuelia Dzhonsona, trans. Aleksandra Liverganta (Moscow: Tekst, 2003). Pp. 188.
  198. James Boswell, “Dr. Johnson's Life in Scenes”: A Reproduction of Those Leaves from James Boswell's Manuscript of the “Life” (Houghton fMS Eng 1836) in Which Dr. Johnson Dines with Mr. Wilkes with a foreword by Mary, Viscountess Eccles, and an afterword by Bruce Redford (Cambridge, Mass.: Houghton Library; Lunenburg, Vermont: Stinehour Press, 2003). Printed for the annual meeting of the Johnsonians, to take place 19 September 2003 at Houghton Library in Cambridge, Massachusetts in celebration of Samuel Johnson's 294th birthday. Pp. 32. Not seen.
  199. James Boswell, Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides with Samuel Johnson (Whitefish, Mont.: Kessinger, 2004). Pp. 277. Not seen.
  200. James Boswell, Yuehanxun zhuan, trans. Luojia Luo and Luofu Mo (Beijing: Zhongguo she hui ke xue chu ban she, 2004). Pp. 11 + 1 + 11 + 6 + 4 + 540. Chinese translation of Boswell's Life. Not seen.
  201. James Boswell, An Account of Corsica, the Journal of a Tour to That Island, and Memoirs of Pascal Paoli, ed. James T. Boulton and T. O. McLoughlin (Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, 2006). Pp. lii + 250. Reviews:
    • Michael Lister, TLS 5381 (19 May 2006): 33.
  202. James Boswell, James Boswell: The Journal of His German and Swiss Travels, 1764, ed. Marlies K. Danziger (Edinburgh: Edinburgh Univ. Press; New Haven: Yale Univ. Press, 2008). Pp. liii + 436. Reviews:
    • Jeremy Black, Johnsonian News Letter 60, no. 1 (March 2009): 49–50.
  203. James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson, ed. David P. Womersley (London: Penguin Books, 2008). Pp. 1408. Reviews:
    • Lewis Jones, “Amorous to Zealous,” Financial Times, 10 Jan. 2009 (with other works).
  204. Ann Bowden and William B. Todd, “Scott's Commentary on The Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides with Samuel Johnson,” Studies in Bibliography 48 (1995): 229–48.
  205. Steven William Bouler, “‘Thunder O'er the Drowsy Pit’: The Performance Historiography of Samuel Johnson's Mahomet and Irene at Drury Lane,” Ph.D. dissertation, University of California at Santa Barbara, 2002.
  206. James T. Boulton, “The Wisdom of Samuel Johnson,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield) (1997): 11–23.
  207. W. Michael Bourke, “One Dogma and One Innocuous Truth of Relativism: Incommensurability, Indeterminism, and Hans-Georg Gadamer,” M.A. thesis, Simon Fraser Univ., 1996. Not seen.
  208. Toni O'Shaughnessy Bowers, “Maternal Ideology and Matriarchal Authority: British Literature and the Making of Middle-Class Motherhood, 1680–1750,” Dissertation Abstracts International 52, no. 9 (March 1992): 3289A. Stanford University. Not seen.
  209. Toni O'Shaughnessy Bowers, “Critical Complicities: Savage Mothers, Johnson's Mother, and the Containment of Maternal Difference,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 5 (1992): 115–46.
  210. Gay W. Brack, “Tetty and Samuel Johnson: The Romance and the Reality,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 5 (1992): 147–78.
  211. Gay Wilson Brack, “Sir John Hawkins, Biographer of Johnson: A Rhetorical Analysis,” Dissertation Abstracts International 53, no. 3 (Sept. 1992): 815A. Arizona State University. Not seen.
  212. O M Brack, Jr., “Samuel Johnson and the Epitaph on a Duckling,” Books at Iowa 45 (Nov. 1986): 62–79.
  213. O M Brack, Jr., “Surviving as a Professional Author: The Case of Samuel Johnson,” The New Rambler D:2 (1986–87), 19–21.
  214. O M Brack, Jr., “Samuel Johnson Bicentenary Exhibitions and Catalogues,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 1 (1987): 451–65.
  215. O M Brack, Jr., “The Gentleman's Magazine Concealed Printing, and the Texts of Samuel Johnson's Lives of Admiral Robert Blake and Sir Francis Drake,” Studies in Bibliography 40 (1987): 140–46.
  216. O M Brack, Jr., “Johnson's Life of Admiral Blake and the Development of a Biographical Technique,” Modern Philology 85, no. 4 (May 1988): 523–31.
  217. O M Brack, Jr., “Johnson's Use of Sources in the Life of Sir Francis Drake,” Rocky Mountain Review of Language and Literature 42 (1988): 197–215.
  218. O M Brack, Jr., Bred a Bookseller: Samuel Johnson on Vellum Books: A New Essay for The Samuel Johnson Society of Southern California (Mesa, Arizona: Lofgreen's Printing, 1990). Pp. 8.
  219. O M Brack, Jr., “An Edition of Samuel Johnson's Miscellaneous Prose Writings,” The East-Central Intelligencer 4, no. 3 (Sept. 1990): 11–13.
  220. O M Brack, Jr., “Samuel Johnson Edits for the Booksellers: Sir Thomas Browne's ‘Christian Morals’ (1756) and ‘The English Works of Roger Ascham’ (1761),” Library Chronicle of the University of Texas 21, nos. 3–4 (1991), pp. 12–39.
  221. O M Brack, Jr., ed., Samuel Johnson and Thomas Maurice (Privately printed, 1992). Pp. 14. For the Samuel Johnson Society of Southern California, 1991, and the Johnson Society of the Central Region, 1992.
  222. O M Brack, Jr., “Samuel Johnson and the Preface to Abbé Prevost's Memoirs of a Man of Quality,” Studies in Bibliography 47 (1994): 155–64.
  223. O M Brack, Jr., “Samuel Johnson and the Translations of Jean Pierre de Crousaz's Examen and Commentaire,” Studies in Bibliography 48 (1995): 60–84.
  224. O M Brack, Jr., comp., Samuel Johnson in New Albion: A Descriptive Census of Rare and Useful Johnson Books and Manuscripts and Johnsoniana Now Located in California with an introduction by Loren Rothschild (New York: The Johnsonians; Los Angeles: The Samuel Johnson Society of Southern California, 1997). Pp. 98.
  225. O M Brack, Jr., “Johnson's First Allusion to Mary Queen of Scots,” Johnsonian News Letter 54, no. 1 (Sept. 2003): 51–53.
  226. O M Brack, Jr., “The Harleian Miscellany: Lost Printing of Volume One Found,” Johnsonian News Letter 56, no. 2 (Sept. 2005): 31–35.
  227. O M Brack, Jr., “Samuel Johnson Revises a Debate,” The Eighteenth-Century Intelligencer 21, no. 3 (Sept. 2007): 1–3.
  228. O M Brack, Jr., “The Works of Samuel Johnson and the Canon,” in Samuel Johnson after 300 Years, ed. Greg Clingham and Philip Smallwood (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2009), pp. 246–61.
  229. O M Brack, Jr., Samuel Johnson, Literary Giant of the Eighteenth Century: An Exhibition at the Huntington Library, May 23–September 21, 2009 (Phoenix: Rasselas Press, 2011). Pp. xli + 77.
  230. O M Brack, JR., “Reassessing Sir John Hawkins's The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.: Some Reflections,” in Reconsidering Biography: Contexts, Controversies, and Sir John Hawkins's Life of Johnson, ed. Martine W. Brownley (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 2012), pp. 1–55. <--4/18/14-->
  231. O M Brack, Jr., and Susan Carlile, “Samuel Johnson's Contribution to Charlotte Lennox's The Female Quixote,” Yale University Library Gazette 77, nos. 3–4 (April 2003): 166–73. Not seen.
  232. O M Brack, Jr., and Robert DeMaria, Jr., “Some Remarks on the Progress of Learning: A New Preface by Samuel Johnson,” The New Rambler E:6 (2002–3): 61–74. Includes the text of the Remarks.
  233. O M Brack, Jr., and Mary Early, “Samuel Johnson's Proposals for the Harleian Miscellany,” Studies in Bibliography 45 (1992): 127–30.
  234. Susan D. Bradley, “Cognitive Subjectivity and the Modern Informal Essay: A Study of Montaigne and Johnson,” M.A. Thesis, Wichita State University, 1994. Not seen.
  235. Geoffrey W. Brand, “A Night with Venus and a Year with Mercury: The Germ Theory in the Eighteenth Century,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 1 (1997): 17–21.
  236. Geoffrey W. Brand, “Hercules with the Distaff: Johnson and Hannah Glasse's The Art of Cookery,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 4 (2000): 17–21.
  237. Richard Braverman, “The Narrative Architecture of Rasselas,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual, 3 (1990): 91–111.
  238. Charlotte Brewer, “Johnson, Webster, and the Oxford English Dictionary,” in A Companion to the History of the English Language, ed. Haruko Momma and Michael Matto (Maldon, Mass.: Wiley-Blackwell, 2008), pp. 112–21.
  239. Peter M. Briggs, “‘News from the Little World’: A Critical Glance at Eighteenth-Century British Advertising,” Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture 23 (1993): 29–45.
  240. Adrian Bristow, ed., Dr Johnson and Mrs Thrale's Tour in North Wales 1774 (Wrexham: Bridge Books, 1995). Pp. 147.
  241. J. Brody, “Constantes et modeles de la critique anti-‘manieriste’ à l'age ‘classique,’” Rivista di litterature moderne e comparate 40, no. 2 (1987): 95–121.
  242. David Bromwich, “Samuel Johnson,” in Literary Genius: 25 Classic Writers Who Define English & American Literature, ed. Joseph Epstein, with wood engravings by Barry Moser (Philadelphia: Paul Dry Books, 2007), pp. 46–55.
  243. Bertrand H. Bronson and J. M. O'Meara, eds., Selections from Johnson on Shakespeare (New Haven: Yale Univ. Press, 1986). Pp. xxxvii + 373. Reviews:
    • John H. Middendorf, Johnsonian News Letter 46, no. 2–47, no. 2 (June 1986–June 1987): 4;
    • Howard Mills, English 39, no. 163 (Spring 1990): 65–70 (with other works);
    • J. D. Fleeman, N&Q 35 (March 1988): 98–99.
  244. Christopher Brooks, “Johnson's Insular Mind and the Analogy of Travel: A Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland,” Essays in Literature 18, no. 1 (Spring 1991), pp. 21–36.
  245. Christopher Brooks, “Nekayah's Courage and Female Wisdom,” College Language Association Journal 36, no. 1 (Sept. 1992): 52–72.
  246. Allan Brown, “The Making of Boswell,” The Sunday Times, 16 Sept. 2001. Discusses Sisman, Boswell's Presumptuous Task; Bainbridge, According to Queeney; and Boswell's Edinburgh Journals, 1767–1786.
  247. Anthony E. Brown, Boswellian Studies: A Bibliography, 3rd ed. (Edinburgh: Edinburgh Univ. Press, 1991). Pp. xiii + 176. Reviews:
    • Pat Rogers, The New Rambler, D:7 (1991–92), 40–41.
  248. Paul Brown, “A New View of Johnson's Putative Psychological Disorder: In Praise of Mothers,” Johnson Society of Australia Papers 5 (2001): 37–43.
  249. Morris R. Brownell, “Johnson and Mauritius Lowe,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 1 (1987): 111–126.
  250. Morris R. Brownell, “‘Dr. Johnson's Ghost’: Genesis of a Satirical Engraving,” Huntington Library Quarterly 50, no. 4 (Autumn 1987): 338–57.
  251. Morris R. Brownell, Samuel Johnson's Attitude to the Arts (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1989). Pp. xvii + 195. Reviews:
    • Charles A. Knight, JEGP 90, no. 2 (1991): 245–46;
    • A. F. T. Lurcock, N&Q 38, no. 1 (1991): 113–14;
    • P. D. McGlynn, Choice 27, no. 4 (Dec. 1989): 1967;
    • Carey McIntosh, The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 4 (1991): 404–8;
    • John H. Middendorf, Johnsonian News Letter 49, no. 3–50, no. 2 (Sept. 1989–June 1990): 20;
    • Ronald Paulson, Eighteenth-Century Studies 23, no. 3 (Spring 1990): 358–65;
    • Claude Rawson, London Review of Books 13, no. 15 (1991): 15–17;
    • Irène Simon, English Studies 72, no. 3 (1991): 277–80;
    • Terry Skeats, Library Journal 114, no. 5 (15 March 1989): 17;
    • David Womersley, Review of English Studies 42 (1991): 120–21.
  252. Morris R. Brownell, “A Bull in the China Shop of Taste: Johnson's Prejudice against the Arts Illustrated,” The New Rambler D:6 (1990–91), 28–31.
  253. Martine Watson Brownley, “The Antagonisms and Affinities of Johnson and Gibbon,” Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture 16 (1986): 183–95.
  254. Martine Watson Brownley, “Liberty in the Literary Criticism of Samuel Johnson,” chapter 3 (pp. 37–50) of The Inner Vision: Liberty and Literature, ed. Edward B. McLean (Wilmington: ISI Books, 2006).
  255. Conrad Brunström, “‘Not Worth Going to See’: The Place of Ireland in Samuel Johnson's Imagination,” Eighteenth-Century Ireland/Iris an dé chultúr 16 (2001): 73–82. Not seen.
  256. Mary Bryden, “Samuel Johnson and Beckett's Happy Days,” N&Q 40, no. 4 (Dec. 1993): 503–4.
  257. Michael Bundock, “An Association Copy of Mrs Piozzi's Anecdotes,” The New Rambler E:2 (1998–99), 63–67.
  258. Michael Bundock, “Johnson's ‘Vile Melancholy’ and The Life of Savage,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 11 (2000): 177–85. A Response to Stavisky, “Johnson's ‘Vile Melancholy’ Reconsidered Once More.”
  259. Michael Bundock, “The ‘Prayers and Meditations’ of Samuel Johnson,” The New Rambler E:5 (2001–2): 11–23.
  260. Michael Bundock, “The Making of Johnson's Prayers and Meditations,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual, 14 (2003): 77–97.
  261. Michael Bundock, “From Slave to Heir: The Strange Journey of Francis Barber,” The New Rambler E:7 (2003–4): 12–28.
  262. Michael Bundock, “Johnson and Women in Boswell's Life of Johnson,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 16 (2005): 81–109.
  263. Michael Bundock, “Samuel Johnson Tercentenary 2009,” Johnsonian News Letter 60, no. 1 (March 2009): 36–38.
    A two-page calendar of lectures and other celebrations of Johnson's 300th birthday around the world.
  264. Michael Bundock, “Johnsonian Celebrations in England: From Lichfield to the Lords, by Way of the Guildhall,” Johnsonian News Letter 60, no. 2 (Sept. 2009): 29–31.
  265. Michael Bundock, “Did John Hawkins Steal Johnson's Diary?,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 21 (2011): 77–92.
  266. Michael Bundock, “Searching for the Invisible Man: The Images of Francis Barber,” in Editing Lives, ed. Jesse G. Swan (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 2014), pp. 107–22.
  267. Anthony Burgess, “The Dictionary Makers,” Wilson Quarterly 17, no. 3 (1993): 104–10.
  268. John J. Burke, Jr., “The Documentary Value of Boswell's Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides,” in Fresh Reflections on Samuel Johnson, ed. Prem Nath (Troy: Whitston, 1987), pp. 349–72.
  269. John J. Burke, Jr., “When the Falklands First Demanded an Historian: Johnson, Junius, and the Making of History in 1771,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 2 (1989): 291–310.
  270. John J. Burke, Jr., “The Originality of Boswell's Version of Johnson's Quarrel with Lord Chesterfield,” in New Light on Boswell, ed. Greg Clingham (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1991), pp. 143–61.
  271. John J. Burke, Jr., “Talk, Dialogue, Conversation, and Other Kinds of Speech Acts in Boswell's Life of Samuel Johnson,” in Compendious Conversations: The Method of Dialogue in the Early Enlightenment, ed. Kevin L. Cope (Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 1992), pp. 65–79.
  272. John J. Burke, Jr., “Boswell and the Text of Johnson's Logia,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 9 (1998): 25–46. See also Greene, “‘Beyond Probability’: A Boswellian Act of Faith.”
  273. John J. Burke, Jr., “‘Johnson as Zeus, Boswell as Danaë’: Que(e)r(y)ing Sex and Gender Roles in Boswell's Life of Johnson,” 1650–1850: Ideas, Æsthetics, and Inquiries in the Early Modern Era 7 (2002): 375–85.
  274. [Add to item 10/6:376] John J. Burke, Jr., and Donald Kay, eds., The Unknown Samuel Johnson (Madison: Univ. of Wisconsin Press, 1983). Reviews:
    • Frederick M. Keener, Yearbook of English Studies 17 (1987): 299–300;
    • Steven Lynn, South Atlantic Review 51, no. 1 (Jan. 1986): 128–30 (with other works).
  275. F. D. A. Burns, “William Shenstone's Years at Oxford,” Notes & Queries 45, no. 4 (1998): 462–64.
  276. Kate Burridge, “ ‘Corruptions of Ignorance,’ ‘Caprices of Innovation’: Linguistic Purism and the Lexicographer,” The Johnson Society of Australia Papers 10 (Aug. 2008): 25–38
  277. Robert Burrowes, Essay on the Stile of Doctor Samuel Johnson, ed. Frank H. Ellis (New York: AMS Press, 1992). Pp. xxii + 56. Reviews:
    • Greg Clingham, British Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies 9 (1986): 248–49.
  278. John Burrows, “The Englishing of Juvenal: Computational Stylistics and Translated Texts,” Style 35, no. 4 (2002): 677–99.
  279. Jamie Bush, “Authorial Authority: Johnson's Life of Savage and Nabokov's Nikolai Gogol,” Biography 19, no. 1 (Winter 1996): 19–40.
  280. James Nicholas Damian Bush, “Samuel Johnson and the Art of Domesticity,” Ph.D. dissertation, University of Toronto, 2002.
  281. Jamie Bush, “Courtship and Private Character in Johnson's Rambler Essays on Marriage,” English Language Notes 43, no. 2 (2005): 50–58. Not seen.
  282. A. J. L. Busst, “Scottish Second Sight: The Rise and Fall of a European Myth,” European Romantic Review 5, no. 2 (1995): 149–77.
  283. Robin Butlin, “Landscape, Literature and English Religious Culture, 1660–1800: Samuel Johnson and Languages of Natural Description,” Progress in Human Geography 31, no. 3 (June 2007): 421–22.
  284. John W. Byrne, “To Drive the Night Along”: A Mansucript of Samuel Johnson's Latin Translation of a Greek Epigram (Los Angeles: Samuel Johnson Society of the West, 2009). Pp. 6 and a single loose facsimile.
  285. Silvia Cacchiani, “Desperately, Utterly and Other Intensifiers: On Their Inclusion and Definition in Dr Johnson's Dictionary,” Textus: English Studies in Italy 19, no. 1 (Jan.–June 2006): 217–36. Not seen.
  286. Annette Cafarelli, “Narrative, Sequence, and Biography: Johnson and Romantic Prose,” Dissertation Abstracts International 46, no. 9 (March 1986): 2697–98A. Not seen.
  287. Annette Wheeler Cafarelli, “Johnson's Lives of the Poets and the Romantic Canon,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 1 (1987): 403–35.
  288. Annette Cafarelli, Prose in the Age of Poets: Romanticism and Biographical Narrative from Johnson to De Quincey (Philadelphia: Univ. of Pennsylvania Press, 1990). Pp. vi + 301.
  289. Annette Wheeler Cafarelli, “Johnson and Women: Demasculinizing Literary History,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 5 (1992): 61–114.
  290. Michael Caldwell, “Dr. Clark and Mr. Holmes: Speculation in Johnsonian Biography,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 8 (1997): 133–48.
  291. Craig R. Callen, “Comments: Kicking Rocks with Dr. Johnson: A Comment on Professor Allen's Theory,” Cardozo Law Review 13, nos. 2–3 (Nov. 1991): 423.
  292. Charles Leo Campbell, “Image and Symbol in Rasselas: Narrative Form and ‘The Flux of Life,’” English Studies in Canada 16, no. 3 (Sept. 1990): 263–77.
  293. Charles Campbell, “Johnson's Arab: Anti-Orientalism in Rasselas,” Abhath al-Yarmouk 12, no. 1 (1994): 51–66.
  294. Ian Campbell, “Boswell's Life of Johnson,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield) (1996): 1–10.
  295. Stuart Campbell, Boswell's Bus Pass (Dingwall: Sandstone, 2011). Pp. xiv + 228.
  296. John Ashton Cannon, Samuel Johnson and the Politics of Hanoverian England (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1994). Pp. vii + 326. Reviews:
    • Jeremy Black, N&Q 42 (Dec. 1995): 499–500;
    • O M Brack, Jr., Rocky Mountain Review of Language and Literature 49, no. 2 (1995): 169–74 (with other works);
    • Linda Colley, TLS, 4 Aug. 1995, pp. 6–7 (with another work);
    • H. T. Dickinson, British Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies 19, no. 2 (Autumn 1996): 220;
    • M. Fitzpatrick, History Today 46, no. 5 (May 1996): 60 (with another work);
    • E. H. Gould, Journal of Modern History, 69, no. 4 (Dec. 1997): 828–29 (with another work);
    • Donald J. Greene, “The Double Tradition of Samuel Johnson's Politics,” Huntington Library Quarterly 59, no. 1 (1997): 105–23 (with another work);
    • Nicholas Hudson, The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 9 (1998): 337–47;
    • Thomas Kaminski, Philological Quarterly 76, no. 1 (Winter 1997): 101–4;
    • G. Lamoine, Etudes anglaises 49, no. 1 (Jan.–March 1996): 90–91;
    • Jack Lynch, Choice 33, no. 1 (Sept. 1995): 110;
    • Judith Moore, The Eighteenth Century: A Current Bibliography 20–21 (2001 for 1994–95), 503;
    • J. Phillips, Albion 28, no. 1 (Spring 1996): 109–11;
    • Murray G. H. Pittock, JEGP 95, no. 4 (Oct. 1996): 558–60;
    • Christopher Reid, The New Rambler D:11 (1995–96), 62–63;
    • James J. Sack, American Historical Review 101, no. 3 (June 1996): 847–48;
    • P. D. G. Thomas, English Historical Review 112 (June 1997): 778;
    • John Wiltshire, English Language Notes 34, no. 1 (Sept. 1996): 98–104 (with another work).
  297. William B. Carey, “Doctor Johnson on Corporal Punishment,” Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics 22, no. 5 (Oct. 2001): 333. Brief quotation from Boswell.
  298. Erik Carlquist, “Samuel Johnson före Boswell,” Kulturtidskriften Horisont 34, no. 2 (1987): 10–11. In Swedish.
  299. Geoffrey Carnall, “A Conservative Mind under Stress: Aspects of Johnson's Political Writings,” in Re-Viewing Samuel Johnson, ed. Nalini Jain (Bombay: Popular Prakashan, 1991), pp. 30–46.
  300. W. B. Carnochan, “The Call of Abyssinia: Father Lobo, Samuel Johnson, and Rasselas,” chapter 1 (pp. 3–15) of Golden Legends: Images of Abyssinia, Samuel Johnson to Bob Marley (Stanford: Stanford Univ. Press, 2008). Reviews:
    • Felipe Fernández-Armesto, “Nowhere Land,” TLS 5566 (4 Dec. 2009): 7 (with another work).
  301. Susan Catto, “Bonnie Prince Sam?: Mud Is Being Vehemently Slung over Whether a Great 18th-Century Critic Was a Closet Supporter of Prince Charles Edward Stuart,” National Post, 18 May 2000, A17.
  302. James J. Caudle, “The Church's Kicked Foundation: A Concealed Johnsonian Detail,” Johnsonian News Letter 58, no. 2 (Sept. 2007): 42–48.
  303. James J. Caudle, “‘O Rare Sam Jonson’: James Boswell's Journal of a Tour to Hawthornden Castle with Samuel Johnson and Ben Jonson, 1773,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 22 (2012): 23–71.
  304. Richard Cavendish, “Publication of Dr Johnson's Dictionary: April 15th, 17th,” History Today 55, no. 4 (April 2005): 52–53.
  305. Wallace Chafe, “Cowper's Connoisseur #138 and Samuel Johnson,” Georgetown University Round Table on Languages and Linguistics (1985), pp. 214–25.
  306. Alan Chalmers, “Scottish Prospects: Thomas Pennant, Samuel Johnson, and the Possibilities of Travel Narrative,” in Historical Boundaries, Narrative Forms: Essays on British Literature in the Long Eighteenth Century in Honor of Everett Zimmerman, ed. Lorna Clymer and Robert Mayer (Newark: Univ. of Delaware Press, 2007), pp. 199–214.
  307. Sir Robert Chambers, A Course of Lectures on the English Law: Delivered at the University of Oxford 1767–1773, ed. Thomas M. Curley, 2 vols. (Madison: Univ. of Wisconsin Press, 1986). Pp. xix + 483; xv + 445. Reviews:
    • John L. Abbot, The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 2 (1989): 498–503;
    • David Ibbetson, N&Q 35 (1988): 540–41;
    • Jeffrey Hackney, Review of English Studies 39 (Nov. 1988): 561–62;
    • John H. Middendorf, Johnsonian News Letter 46, no. 2–47, no. 2 (June 1986–June 1987): 1–2;
    • J. T. Scanlan, The New Rambler E:2 (1998–99), 68–69.
  308. David Chandler, “John Henry Colls and the Remarks on the Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides,” N&Q 42, no. 4 (Dec. 1995): 469–71.
  309. Naresh Chandra, “Dr. Johnson and the English Language,” in Essays on Dr. Samuel Johnson, ed. T. R. Sharma (Meerut, India: Shalabh, 1986), pp. 5–24.
  310. Huei-keng Chang, “Mimesis and Copia as Enflaming Strategies: The Function of Samuel Johnson's Philological and Literary Criticism,” Humanitas Taiwanica 48 (1998): 199–218.
  311. Huei-keng Chang, “The Purloined Shakespeare and Samuel Johnson's Scriptural Operation,” Humanitas Taiwanica 50 (1999): 143–98.
  312. Huei-keng Chang, “Genre Criticism, Textual Strategy and Différance: Historicizing Samuel Johnson's Writing of Private Lives,” Studies in Language & Literature 9 (June 2000): 61–86. Not seen.
  313. Huei-keng Chang, “Samuel Johnson and Translating Pastoral,” Humanitas Taiwanica 58 (2003): 212–30.
  314. Huei-keng Chang, “Signs Taken for Wonders: The Vanity of Human Wishes and the Production of a ‘Relevant’ Translation,” NTU Studies in Language and Literature 14 (Sept. 2006): 55–80. Not seen.
  315. Chester Chapin, “Religion and the Nature of Samuel Johnson's Toryism,” Cithara: Essays in the Judaeo-Christian Tradition 29, no. 2 (May 1990): 38–54.
  316. Chester Chapin, “Samuel Johnson, Anthropologist,” Eighteenth-Century Life 19 (Nov. 1995): 22–37.
  317. Chester Chapin, “Samuel Johnson and the Locke-Stillingfleet Controversy,” N&Q 44, no. 2 (June 1997): 210–11.
  318. Chester Chapin, “Samuel Johnson, Samuel Clarke and the Toleration of Heresy,” Enlightenment and Dissent 16 (1997): 136–50.
  319. Chester Chapin, “Samuel Johnson and Joseph Addison's Anti-Jacobite Writings,” Notes & Queries 48, no. 1 (March 2001): 38–40.
  320. Chester Chapin, “Samuel Johnson: Latitudinarian or High Churchman?,” Cithara: Essays in the Judeo-Christian Tradition 41, no. 1 (Nov. 2001): 35–43.
  321. Chester Chapin, “Samuel Johnson and the Geologists,” Cithara 42, no. 1 (2002): 33–44. Not seen.
  322. Chester Chapin, “Samuel Johnson on Education and the English Class Structure,” 1650–1850: Ideas, Æsthetics, and Inquiries in the Early Modern Era 9 (2003): 189–206.
  323. Chester Chapin, “Samuel Johnson and the Argument from Prophecy,” Cithara 45, no. 1 (Nov. 2005): 28–40.
  324. Chester Chapin, “Samuel Johnson and the Church's Convocation,” Cithara 46, no. 2 (May 2007): 16–24.
  325. James Aaron Chapman, “The Foundation of Samuel Johnson's Morality,” M.A. Thesis, University of Southern Mississippi, 1995. Not seen.
  326. Michael J. Chappell, “Samuel Johnson and Community,” Dissertation Abstracts International 60, no. 8 (Feb. 2000): 2937A. Fordham Univ. Not seen.
  327. Michael Chappell, “‘The Meer Gift of Luck’: A Tale of Lottery Addiction in Rambler 181,” Dalhousie Review 82, no. 3 (Autumn 2002): 481–90.
  328. Michael J. Chappell, “Not Your Father's (or Mother's) Johnson,” Johnsonian News Letter 54, no. 1 (Sept. 2003): 14–16.
  329. Lianhong Chen, “A Cross-Cultural Dialogue: Eighteenth-Century British Representations of China,” Dissertation Abstracts, 57 (1997): 4748–49A. Not seen.
  330. Warren Chernaik, “Johnson and the Imagination,” The New Rambler E:1 (1997–98), 42–49.
  331. Charles Waddell Chesnutt, Who and Why Was Samuel Johnson (Akron: Northern Ohio Bibliophilic Society, 1991). Pp. iv + 19. With a preface by Robert A. Tibbetts. Keepsake volume of the text of a 1911 speech by Chesnutt. Reprinted in Charles W. Chesnutt: Essays and Speeches, ed. Joseph R. McElrath, Jr., Robert C. Leitz III, and Jesse S. Crisler (Stanford: Stanford Univ. Press, 1999).
  332. Tita Chico, “Rasselas and the Rise of the Novel,” Johnsonian News Letter 56, no. 1 (March 2005): 8–11.
  333. Leslie A. Chilton, “Samuel Johnson and the Adventures of Telemachus,” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield) (1993): 8–13.
  334. Kate Chisolm, Wits and Wives: Dr Johnson in the Company of Women (London: Chatto & Windus, 2011). Pp. 291.
  335. Chung-Ho Chung, “The Great Cham and the Mirror: An Essay on the Multiple Perspectives in Samuel Johnson's Literary Criticism,” Dissertation Abstracts International 48, no. 9 (March 1988): 2342A.
  336. H. N. Claman, “Creativity and Illness: Christopher Smart and Samuel Johnson,” Pharos Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society 64, no. 33 (Summer 2001): 4–7. Not seen.
  337. Jonathan Clark, “The Heartfelt Toryism of Dr. Johnson,” TLS, 14 Oct. 1994, pp. 17–18.
  338. J. C. D. Clark, Samuel Johnson: Literature, Religion and English Cultural Politics from the Restoration to Romanticism (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1994). Pp. xiv + 270. Reviews:
    • O M Brack, Jr., Rocky Mountain Review of Language and Literature 49, no. 2 (1995): 169–74 (with other works);
    • John Cannon, The English Historical Review 112, no. 446 (April 1997): 491–93;
    • Matthew M. Davis, Modern Age 39, no. 1 (Winter 1997): 73–76;
    • Paul Dean, “Augustans and Romantics,” English Studies 77, no. 1 (Jan. 1996): 81–85 (with other works);
    • M. Fitzpatrick, History Today 46, no. 5 (May 1996): 60 (with another work);
    • Mark Goldie, Political Studies 43, no. 4 (Dec. 1995): 777;
    • E. H. Gould, Journal of Modern History 69, no. 4 (Dec. 1997): 828–29 (with another work);
    • Donald Greene, “The Double Tradition of Samuel Johnson's Politics,” Huntington Library Quarterly 59, no. 1 (1997): 105–23 (with another work);
    • John Gross, Sunday Telegraph, 13 Nov. 1994, p. 10;
    • Isobel Grundy, The Eighteenth Century: A Current Bibliography 20–21 (2001, for 1994–95), 503–5;
    • H. C. Kraus, Historische Zeitschrift 263, no. 1 (Aug. 1996): 233–34;
    • R. B. Levis, Church History 66, no. 4 (Dec. 1997): 845–46;
    • P. Monod, American Historical Review 102, no. 1 (Feb. 1997): 103–4;
    • David Nokes, TLS, 25 Nov. 1994, pp. 8–9;
    • J. T. Scanlan, Religion & Literature 29, no. 1 (Spring 1997): 95–101;
    • John Wiltshire, English Language Notes 34, no. 1 (Sept. 1996): 98–104 (with another work);
    • David Womersley, The Historical Journal 39, no. 2 (June 1996): 511–20 (with other works).
  339. J. C. D. Clark, “The Politics of Samuel Johnson,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 7 (1996): 27–56.
  340. J. C. D. Clark, “The Cultural Identity of Samuel Johnson,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 8 (1997): 15–70.
  341. J. C. D. Clark, “Religious Affiliation and Dynastic Allegiance in Eighteenth-Century England: Edmund Burke, Thomas Paine and Samuel Johnson,” ELH 64, no. 4 (Winter 1997): 1029–67.
  342. J. C. D. Clark, “Religion and Political Identity: Samuel Johnson as a Nonjuror,” in Samuel Johnson in Historical Context, ed. J. C. D. Clark and Howard Erskine-Hill (Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2002), pp. 79–145.
  343. Jonathan Clark, “Samuel Johnson,” letter to the editor, TLS 5792 (4 April 2014): 6.
  344. J. C. D. Clark and Howard Erskine-Hill, eds., Samuel Johnson in Historical Context (Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2002. Pp. xii + 318. Reviews:
    • James J. Caudle, Albion 35, no. 2 (Summer 2003): 303–5;
    • Paul Baines, Modern Language Review 99, no. 1 (2004): 174–76;
    • Freya Johnston, TLS, 7 June 2002, p. 30;
    • Jack Lynch, Choice 39, no. 11 (July 2002): 6287;
    • Robert Mayhew, British Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies 25, no. 2 (May 2002): 278–79;
    • John Mullan, London Review of Books 26, no. 2 (22 Jan. 2004) (with another work);
    • Selina O'Grady, The Tablet, 10 August 2002, p. 15;
    • Katherine Turner, Essays in Criticism 53, no. 2 (April 2003): 184–91 (with another work);
    • Howard D. Weinbrot, “Johnson and Jaocbite Wars XLV,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 14 (2003): 307–40.
  345. Jonathan Clarke and Howard Erskine-Hill, eds., Interpretation of Samuel Johnson (Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012). Pp. xiv + 230.
  346. Norma Clarke, Dr Johnson's Women (London: Hambledon & London, 2000). Pp. xii + 260. Reviews:
    • Barbara Benedict, Studies in English Literature 1500–1900 41, no. 3 (Summer 2002): 627 (with other works);
    • Christopher Hawtree, The Independent, 5 Feb. 2001, Comment, p. 5;
    • Kathryn Hughes, The Daily Telegraph, 13 Jan. 2001, p. 3;
    • Jack Lynch, Choice 39, no. 10 (Oct. 2001): 771;
    • Janet Todd, TLS, 13 April 2001, p. 33 (“In Brief”);
    • Lance Wilcox, History 65, no. 3 (2003): 751–52 (not seen).
  347. Stephen Clarke, “‘Prejudice, Bigotry, and Arrogance’: Horace Walpole's Abuse of Samuel Johnson,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 14 (2003): 239–57.
  348. Stephen Clarke, “Indifference and Abuse: The Antipathy of Mason, Gray, Walpole and Samuel Johnson,” The New Rambler, E:6 (2002–3): 12–25.
  349. Stephen Clarke, “A Johnson Parody,” Johnsonian News Letter 55, no. 2 (Sept. 2004): 52–55. On Gooseberry Hall, a satire on the sale of Horace Walpole's library, and a parody of Johnson's style.
  350. Stephen Clarke, “Unhorsed by Pegasus: Gray's Poetry and the Critics before The Lives of the Poets,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 21 (2011): 193–215.
  351. E. J. Clery, “Laying the Ground for Gothic: The Passage of the Supernatural from Truth to Spectacle,” in Exhibited by Candlelight: Sources and Developments in the Gothic Tradition, ed. Valeria Tinkler-Villani, Peter Davidson, and Jane Stevenson (Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1995), pp. 65–74.
  352. [Add to item 3:250] James L. Clifford, Dictionary Johnson: Samuel Johnson's Middle Years (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1979). Reviews:
    • Garry Wills, The New Republic 182 (2 Feb. 1980), 36–37.
  353. Dorothy Peake Cline, “The Word Abused: Problematic Religious Language in Selected Prose Works of Swift, Wesley, and Johnson,” Dissertation Abstracts International 52, no. 9 (March 1992): 3290A. University of Delaware. Not seen.
  354. Edward Cline, “Samuel Johnson: Imperious Lexicographer,” Colonial Williamsburg: The Journal of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation 20, no. 1 (Autumn 1997): 42–48.
  355. Greg Clingham, “Johnson on Dryden and Pope,” Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Cambridge, 1986. Not seen.
  356. Greg Clingham, “Johnson's Use of Two Restoration Poems in his ‘Drury-Lane’ Prologue,” The New Rambler D:1 (1985–86), 45–50.
  357. G. J. Clingham, “‘The Inequalities of Memory’: Johnson's Epitaphs on Hogarth,” English: The Journal of the English Association 35, no. 153 (Autumn 1986): 221–32.
  358. Greg Clingham, “A Minor Source for Johnson's ‘Life of Pope,’” Transactions of the Johnson Society (Lichfield), (1986–87), 53–54.
  359. G. J. Clingham, “‘Himself that Great Sublime’: Johnson's Critical Thinking,” Etudes anglaises 41, no. 2 (April–June 1988): 165–78.
  360. Gregory J. Clingham, “Johnson's Criticism of Dryden's Odes in Praise of St. Cecilia,” Modern Language Studies 18, no. 1 (Winter 1988): 165–80.
  361. Greg Clingham, “Johnson, Homeric Scholarship, and ‘The Passes of the Mind,’” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 3 (1990): 113–70.
  362. Greg Clingham, “Johnson's Prayers and Meditations and the ‘Stolen Diary Problem’: Reflections on a Biographical Quiddity,” The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 4 (1991): 83–95.
  363. Greg Clingham, ed., New Light on Boswell: Critical and Historical Essays on the Occasion of the Bicentenary of “The Life of Johnson” (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1991). Pp. xix + 235. Reviews:
    • Paul K. Alkon, Newsletter of the Samuel Johnson Society of Southern California (1991): 5;
    • Philip E. Baruth, Biography 16 (1993): 59–64;
    • Fredric Bogel, Modern Philology 91 (May 1994): 517–23;
    • Alan Bold, Herald Weekender, 29 June 1991;
    • English Studies 73 (1992): 537–38;
    • Forum for Modern Language Studies 28, no. 3 (1992): 292–93;
    • James Gray, Dalhousie Review 71 (1991–92), 502–7;
    • Donald Greene, The Eighteenth Century: A Current Bibliography n.s. 17 (1991 [published 1998]), 338–39;
    • Irma S. Lustig, The Age of Johnson 5 (1992): 447–51;
    • P. D. McGlynn, Choice 29, no. 6 (Feb. 1992): 3178;
    • William B. Ober, Verbatim 18, no. 4 (Spring 1992): 13–14;
    • John B. Radner, Eighteenth-Century Scotland 6 (1992): 15–16;
    • Claude Rawson, London Review of Books, 29 Aug. 1991, p. 17;
    • Angus Ross, Scottish Literary Journal 39 (1994): 9–12;
    • Stuart Sherman, Johnsonian News Letter, 51 (Sept. 1991): 10–12;
    • John B. Vance, South Atlantic Review 58 (1993): 101–9;
    • William Wain, British Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies 16 (1993): 84;
    • Marcus Walsh, Review of English Studies 44 (1993): 428–29;
    • Robert Ziegler, Papers on Language & Literature 29 (1993): 457–49.
  364. Greg Clingham, “Truth and Artifice in Boswell's Life of Johnson,” in New Light on Boswell, ed. Greg Clingham (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1991), pp. 207–29.
  365. Greg Clingham, James Boswell: The Life of Johnson (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1992). Pp. xviii + 131. Landmarks of World Literature Series. Reviews:
    • Gene Blanton, South Atlantic Review 59 (Spring 1994): 125–29;
    • John J. Burke, Jr., 1650–1850: Ideas, Æsthetics, and Inquiries in the Early Modern Era 3 (1997): 409–16;
    • English Studies 75 (1994): 555–56;
    • A. E. Jones, Choice 30, no. 9 (May 1993): 4836;
    • Thomas E. Kinsella, The Age of Johnson 5 (1992): 452–56;
    • Laurence Urdang, Verbatim 20 (Autumn 1993): 8–9 (with another work);
    • Karina Williamson, Scottish Literary Journal 39 (1994): 12–14;
    • Thomas Woodman, British Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies 18 (1995): 92–94;
    • William Zachs, Eighteenth-Century Scotland 7 (1993): 30–31.
  366. Greg Clingham, “Boswell's Historiography,” Studies on Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century 307 (1993): 1765–69.
  367. Greg Clingham, “Another and the Same: Johnson's Dryden,” in Literary Transmission and Authority: Dryden and Other Writers, ed. Jennifer Brady and Earl Miner (Cambridge University Press, 1993), pp. 121–59.
  368. Greg Clingham, “Double Writing: The Erotics of Narrative in Boswell's Life of Johnson,” in James Boswell: Psychological Interpretations, ed. Donald J. Newman (New York: St. Martin's, 1995), pp. 189–214.
  369. Greg Clingham, ed., The Cambridge Companion to Samuel Johnson (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1997; rev. ed., 1999). Pp. xx + 266. Reviews:
    • Contemporary Review 1584 (1 Jan. 1998): 54;
    • Peter Barry, English 47 (Spring 1998): 81–87;
    • Matthew M. Davis, The New Rambler D:12 (1996–97), 56–57;
    • Robert Devens, British Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies 21, no. 2 (1998): 233–34;
    • Robert Folkenflik, Eighteenth-Century Studies 33, no. 2 (Winter 2000): 297–99 (with other works);
    • Kathleen Kemmerer, East-Central Intelligencer 13, no. 2 (May 1999): 19–21;
    • Gwin J. Kolb, Modern Philology 98, no. 4 (May 2001): 679–82;
    • G. Lamoine, Etudes anglaises 51, no. 3 (July–Sept. 1998): 347–48 (in French);
    • A. F. T. Lurcock, Notes & Queries 46, no. 1 (March 1999): 135–36;
    • Irma S. Lustig, Albion 31, no. 3 (Fall 1999): 493–94;
    • Jack Lynch, Choice 35, no. 11–12 (July–Aug. 1998): 6080;
    • Jack Lynch, Essays in Criticism 49, no. 1 (Jan. 1999): 75–81;
    • Alvaro Ribeiro, S.J., The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 10 (1999): 292–302;
    • Keith Walker, Yearbook of English Studies 30 (2000): 312–14;
    • YWES 78 (2000 for 1997): 451–53 (with other works).
  370. Greg Clingham, “Life and Literature in Johnson's Lives of the Poets,” in The Cambridge Companion to Samuel Johnson, ed. Greg Clingham (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1997), pp. 161–91.
  371. Greg Clingham, “Resisting Johnson,” in Johnson Re-Visioned: Looking Before and After, ed. Philip Smallwood (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 2001), pp. 19–36.
  372. Greg Clingham, ed., The Cambridge Companion to Samuel Johnson Chinese-language edition (Shanghai: Shanghai Foreign Language Education Press, 2001). Not seen.
  373. Greg Clingham, “Roscommon's ‘Academy,’ Chetwood's Manuscript ‘Life of Roscommon,’ and Dryden's Translation Project,” Restoration 26, no. 1 (2002): 15–26.
  374. Greg Clingham, Johnson, Writing, and Memory (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2002). Pp. xii + 222. Reviews:
    • Robert DeMaria, Jr., Johnsonian News Letter 55, no. 1 (March 2004): 56–58;
    • Brian Hanley, The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual 14 (2003): 409–12;
    • Henry Hitchings, TLS, 28 Nov. 2003, p. 30;
    • Tony Howe, Romanticism 13, no. 1 (2007): 86–88;
    • Kathleen Kemmerer, East-Central Intelligencer 18, no. 2 (2004): 29–30;
    • Jack Lynch, Choice 40, no. 8 (April 2003): 4460;
    • Steven Scherwatzky, Eighteenth-Century Fiction 17, no. 2 (2005): 290–93.
  375. Greg Clingham, “Johnson at Bucknell,” Johnsonian News Letter 59, no. 1 (March 2008): 30–32.
  376. Greg Clingham, “Anna Williams's Miscellanies in Prose and Verse in the Houghton Library,” Johnsonian News Letter 59, no. 1 (March 2008): 44–45.
  377. Greg Clingham, “Johnson, Ends, and the Possibility of Happiness,” in Samuel Johnson after 300 Years, ed. Greg Clingham and Philip Smallwood (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2009), pp. 33–54.
  378. Greg Clingham, “A Johnsonian in Japan,” Johnsonian News Letter 60, no. 2 (Sept. 2009): 37–40.
  379. Greg Clingham, “Hawkins, Biography, and the Law,” in Reconsidering Biography: Contexts, Controversies, and Sir John Hawkins's Life of Johnson, ed. Martine W. Brownley (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ. Press, 2012), pp. 137–54.
  380. G. J. Clingham and N. Hopkinson, “Johnson's Copy of the Iliad at Felbrigg Hall, Norfolk,” The Book Collector 37, no. 4 (Winter 1988): 503–21.
  381. Greg Clingham and Philip Smallwood, eds., Samuel Johnson after 300 Years (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2009). Pp. 291. Reviews:
    • H. J. Jackson, “By Perseverance,” TLS 5551–52 (21 & 28 Aug. 2009): 13–14 (with other works).
  382. Martin Clout, “Hester Thrale and the Globe Theatre,” The New Rambler D:9 (1993–94), 34–50.
  383. Hamilton E. Cochrane, Boswell's Literary Art: An Annotated Bibliography of Critical Studies, 1900–1985 (New York: Garland, 1992). Pp. ix + 162.
  384. Paula Marantz Cohen, “The Talking Life: Boswell and Johnson,” Boulevard 17 (Fall 2001): 115–26. Not seen.
  385. Frank Collings, “Dr. Johnson and his Medical Advisers,” The New Rambler C:25 (1984): 3–18.
  386. Michael Dennis Collins, “Taxation No Tyranny: Samuel Johnson, Barrister to the Crown,” M.A. Thesis, California State University, Northridge, 1989. Not seen.

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