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Case Study Subheadings In A Memo

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Conclusion
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This preliminary design report has discussed the development of a temperature measurement and display system. Temperature measurement and display circuits were built and control software was written to use the added hardware. By keeping track of the measured temperature, the HC11 was able to control an LED temperature scale. Also, if the temperature became very cold or hot, an alarm message was sent to a host PC terminal.

This lab has introduced us to the important topics of A/D conversion and serial communications. The use of the A/D converter has allowed access to analog inputs from within the computer. Besides temperature measurement, the use of an A/D converter has many potential applications in automatic control systems and factory automation. For example, in an electric motor drive, the phase currents and flux are continually measured by using scaling circuitry and an A/D converter input to a microprocessor or DSP. We also expect to use serial communications in our final project to send data to a host PC monitor program that can modify and display important variables in the 68HC11. The systems studied for this lab truly have many potential applications.
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References
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Lineberry, Bob, "Computer Engineering Laboratories Website at Virginia Tech," http://www.ee.vt.edu/cel (Blacksburg, VA: ECE Department, 1998).
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Spasov, Peter, Microcontroller Technology: The 68HC11, 2nd ed. (Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1996).


Attachments:
Appendix A: Hardware Schematic
Appendix B: Pseudo Code for the Software Developed
Appendix C: Program Flow Chart
Appendix D: Program Listing


Copies to:
Michelle Korbut
Patrick Thomas



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Appendix A: Hardware Schematic
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Figure A-1. Hardware schematic for the temperature measurement circuit designed for this lab. In an actual report, all the connections, pin numbers, and pin labels should be shown.

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Appendix B: Pseudo Code for the Software Developed
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XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX*
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*In an actual report, the pseudo code would appear here.


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Appendix C: Program Flow Chart
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Figure C-1. Flow chart for the lab program. In an actual report, you would fill in the blocks.

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Appendix D: Program Listing
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Program Header
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include statements
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Equate Statements
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RAM var defs
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ORG $B600
LDS #$1FF
JSR STARTUP ;Initialize A/D and SCI, init RAM vars
MAIN JSR GETTEMP ;Set RAM var TEMP to current temperature
JSR SETDISP ;Update LED display
JSR TEMPCHK ;Check to see if hot or cold message should be sent
BRA MAIN ;Repeat

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Subroutine Listings
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Interrupt Service Routines
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Format

Summary:

This handout will help you solve your memo-writing problems by discussing what a memo is, describing the parts of memos, and providing examples and explanations that will make your memos more effective.

Contributors:Courtnay Perkins, Allen Brizee
Last Edited: 2010-04-21 08:22:41

The format of a memo follows the general guidelines of business writing. A memo is usually a page or two long, should be single spaced and left justified. Instead of using indentations to show new paragraphs, skip a line between sentences. Business materials should be concise and easy to read. Therefore it is beneficial to use headings and lists to help the reader pinpoint certain information.

You can help your reader understand your memo better by using headings for the summary and the discussion segments that follow it. Write headings that are short but that clarify the content of the segment. For example, instead of using "Summary" for your heading, try "New Advertising Recommendations," which is much more specific. The major headings you choose are the ones that should be incorporated in your purpose-statement in the opening paragraph.

For easy reading, put important points or details into lists rather than paragraphs when possible. This will draw the readers' attention to the section and help the audience remember the information better. Using lists will help you be concise when writing a memo.

The segments of the memo should be allocated in the following manner:

  • Header: 1/8 of the memo
  • Opening, Context and Task: 1/4 of the memo
  • Summary, Discussion Segment: 1/2 of the memo
  • Closing Segment, Necessary Attachments: 1/8 of the memo

This is a suggested distribution of the material to make writing memos easier. Not all memos will be the same and the structure can change as you see necessary. Different organizations may have different formatting procedures, so be flexible in adapting your writing skills.

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